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Urban parking policy in Europe: A conceptualization of past and possible future trends

Author

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  • Mingardo, Giuliano
  • van Wee, Bert
  • Rye, Tom

Abstract

In the last two decades parking has increasingly gained importance in urban planning. Despite the growing number of papers published in recent years, an overall conceptualization of parking policy is still missing. Previous attempts (Shoup, 2005; Litman, 2006; Barter, 2010) focus mainly on the North American planning experience. We try to bridge this gap analysing the evolution of parking policy in Europe. In this paper we first present the key aspects of parking policy, and describe their generic evolution. Next we suggest a novel approach for parking policy making. We conclude by discussing some of the major challenges policy makers will face in the near future regarding parking in urban areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Mingardo, Giuliano & van Wee, Bert & Rye, Tom, 2015. "Urban parking policy in Europe: A conceptualization of past and possible future trends," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 268-281.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:74:y:2015:i:c:p:268-281
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2015.02.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Albalate & Albert Gragera, 2018. "“Misinformation and Misperception in the market for parking”," IREA Working Papers 201812, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2018.
    2. repec:eee:transa:v:101:y:2017:i:c:p:86-97 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Cats, Oded & Zhang, Chen & Nissan, Albania, 2016. "Survey methodology for measuring parking occupancy: Impacts of an on-street parking pricing scheme in an urban center," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 55-63.

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