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The influence of land use on travel behavior: specification and estimation strategies


  • Boarnet, Marlon
  • Crane, Randall


While the relationship between urban form and travel behavior is a key element of many current planning initiatives aimed at reducing car travel, the literature faces two major problems. First, this relationship is extremely complex. Second, several specification and estimation issues are poorly addressed in prior work, possibly generating biased results. We argue that many of the latter problems are overcome by systematically isolating the separable influences of urban design characteristics on travel and then properly analyzing individual-level data. We further clarify which results directly follow from alternative land use arrangements and which may or may not, and thus identify the specific hypotheses to be tested against the data. We then develop more-reliable tests of these hypotheses, and explore the implications of alternative behavioral assumptions regarding travel costs. The measured influence of land use on travel behavior is shown to be very sensitive to the form of the empirical strategy.

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  • Boarnet, Marlon & Crane, Randall, 2001. "The influence of land use on travel behavior: specification and estimation strategies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 823-845, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:35:y:2001:i:9:p:823-845

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Brownstone, David & Golob, Thomas F., 1992. "The effectiveness of ridesharing incentives: Discrete-choice models of commuting in Southern California," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 5-24, March.
    2. Crane, Randall & Crepeau, Richard, 1998. "Does Neighborhood Design Influence Travel?: Behavioral Analysis of Travel Diary and GIS Data," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4pj4s7t8, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Toshiyuki Yamamoto & Ryuichi Kitamura, 1999. "An analysis of time allocation to in-home and out-of-home discretionary activities across working days and non- working days," Transportation, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 231-250, May.
    4. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1997. "Density and the Journey to Work," Working Papers 199701, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
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