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Controversial curves of the economy: An up-to-date investigation of long waves

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  • Focacci, Antonio

Abstract

The question of the validity of the “so called” Kondratieff's theory of long waves has been a well-known controversial issue among historians, economic, social and political science scholars. In this work, the author analyses its consistency and cycles general framework investigating both original Kondratieff's data (never processed by harmonic analysis in their whole dataset) and the latest and longest available economic time-series. Fixing the boundaries of statistical analysis, hence, the main purpose is to furnish an up-to-date empirical contribution in exploring the conceptual cycles hypothesis by recurring to dedicated quantitative techniques applied to strictly economic datasets.

Suggested Citation

  • Focacci, Antonio, 2017. "Controversial curves of the economy: An up-to-date investigation of long waves," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 116(C), pages 271-285.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:tefoso:v:116:y:2017:i:c:p:271-285
    DOI: 10.1016/j.techfore.2016.10.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Betz, Ulrich A.K. & Betz, Frederick & Kim, Rachel & Monks, Brendan & Phillips, Fred, 2019. "Surveying the future of science, technology and business – A 35 year perspective," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 137-147.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Long waves; Business cycles; Spectral analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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