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Determinants of TFP growth: A close look at industries driving the EU-US TFP gap

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  • Mc Morrow, Kieran
  • Röger, Werner
  • Turrini, Alessandro

Abstract

This paper explores the determinants of the EU-US TFP growth gap using EU KLEMS. As found in previous analyses, TFP growth appears to be driven by catching-up phenomena associated with the gradual adoption of new technologies. TFP growth is also significantly driven by developments at the "technological frontier", especially since the mid-1990s. Industries with higher R&D expenditures and higher adoption rates for ICT-intensive technologies appear to exhibit higher TFP growth rates, whilst human capital has mostly a significant effect across countries. Regarding determinants in industries relevant for the different TFP performance of the EU versus the US, ICT-producing industries appear to benefit from R&D in terms of stronger spillovers from TFP gains at the frontier, network utilities are strongly affected by product market regulations, whilst the retail and wholesale trade industry is significantly influenced by consumption dynamics which permit a better exploitation of scale economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Mc Morrow, Kieran & Röger, Werner & Turrini, Alessandro, 2010. "Determinants of TFP growth: A close look at industries driving the EU-US TFP gap," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 165-180, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:21:y:2010:i:3:p:165-180
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jung, Hyun-Joon & Na, Kyoung-Youn & Yoon, Chang-Ho, 2013. "The role of ICT in Korea’s economic growth: Productivity changes across industries since the 1990s," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 292-310.
    2. Almas Heshmati & Subal C. Kumbhakar, 2014. "A general model of technical change with an application to the OECD countries," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 25-48, January.
    3. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2012. "The Transatlantic Productivity Gap: A Survey Of The Main Causes," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(3), pages 395-419, July.
    4. Raquel Ortega-Argilés, 2013. "R&D, knowledge, economic growth and the transatlantic productivity gap," Chapters,in: Handbook of Industry Studies and Economic Geography, chapter 11, pages 271-302 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. repec:eee:ecmode:v:70:y:2018:i:c:p:579-590 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Aleksandra Parteka, 2013. "The Role of Trade in Intra-Industry Productivity Growth—the Case of Old and New European Union Countries," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(4), pages 712-731, November.
    7. Venturini, Francesco, 2015. "The modern drivers of productivity," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 357-369.

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