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Transition with heterogeneous labor

Author

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  • Balla, Katalin
  • Köllo, János
  • Simonovits, András

Abstract

We extend the benchmark model of Aghion and Blanchard [Aghion, P., Blanchard, O.J., 1994. On the speed of transition in Central Europe, NBER Macroecon. Ann. 9, 283-319] assuming that the private sector emerging during the post-communist transition consists of two segments employing high and low-productivity labor, respectively. We assume that the segments are isolated in terms of labor mobility but connected by a national system of taxation. We look at how the key policy variables - the speed of closing the state sector, unemployment benefits and subsidies to the low-productivity segment - affect the paths of employment, wages, aggregate income and equity during and after the transition. We find that the effects of benefit generosity and the job destruction rate are ambiguous and heavily depend on how the other two policy instruments are set. A subsidy can enhance equity without reducing aggregate employment in the whole range of the other two policy parameters. The subsidy has the strongest marginal effect on aggregate employment (income) and equity when the pace of job destruction is high and benefits are generous.

Suggested Citation

  • Balla, Katalin & Köllo, János & Simonovits, András, 2008. "Transition with heterogeneous labor," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 203-220, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:19:y:2008:i:3:p:203-220
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    Cited by:

    1. Jan Svejnar & Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas van der Velde, 2015. "Productivity and Inequality Effects of Rapid Labor Reallocation – Insights from a Meta-Analysis of Studies on Transition," Working Papers 2015-11, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    2. Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas Velde & Jan Svejnar, 2017. "Effects Of Labor Reallocation On Productivity And Inequality—Insights From Studies On Transition," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(3), pages 712-732, July.
    3. Tyrowicz, Joanna & Van der Velde, Lucas, 2017. "Labor Reallocation and Demographics," IZA Discussion Papers 11249, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Joanna Tyrowicz & Lucas van der Velde, 2014. "Can We Really Explain Worker Flows in Transition Economies?," Working Papers 2014-28, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • P31 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Socialist Enterprises and Their Transitions
    • H53 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Welfare Programs

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