IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/socmed/v67y2008i6p1009-1017.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

How important are individual, household and commune characteristics in explaining utilization of maternal health services in Vietnam?

Author

Listed:
  • Sepehri, Ardeshir
  • Sarma, Sisira
  • Simpson, Wayne
  • Moshiri, Saeed

Abstract

Using Vietnam's latest National Household Survey data for 2001-2002 this paper assesses the influence of individual, household and commune-level characteristics on a woman's decision to seek prenatal care, on the number of prenatal visits, and on the choice between giving birth at a health facility or at home. The decision to use any care and the number of prenatal visits is modeled using a two-part model. A random intercept logistic model is used to capture the influence of unobserved commune-specific factors found in the data regarding a woman's decision to give birth at a health facility rather than at home. The results show that access to prenatal care and delivery assistance is limited by observed barriers such as low income, low education, ethnicity, geographical isolation and a high poverty rate in the community. More specifically, more prenatal visits increase the likelihood of giving birth at a health facility. Having compulsory health insurance increases the odds of giving birth at a health facility for middle and high income women. In contrast, health insurance for the poor increases the likelihood of having more prenatal visits but has little effect on the place of delivery. These results suggest that the existing safe motherhood programs should be linked with the objectives of social development programs such as poverty reduction, and that policy makers need to view both the individual and the commune as appropriate units for policy targeting.

Suggested Citation

  • Sepehri, Ardeshir & Sarma, Sisira & Simpson, Wayne & Moshiri, Saeed, 2008. "How important are individual, household and commune characteristics in explaining utilization of maternal health services in Vietnam?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 67(6), pages 1009-1017, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:6:p:1009-1017
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0277-9536(08)00299-2
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raghupathy, Shobana, 1996. "Education and the use of maternal health care in Thailand," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 459-471, August.
    2. Anne Pebley & Noreen Goldman & Germán Rodríguez, 1996. "Prenatal and delivery care and childhood immunization in guatemala: Do family and community matter?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 33(2), pages 231-247, May.
    3. A. C. Cameron & P. K. Trivedi & Frank Milne & J. Piggott, 1988. "A Microeconometric Model of the Demand for Health Care and Health Insurance in Australia," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(1), pages 85-106.
    4. Celik, Yusuf & Hotchkiss, David R., 2000. "The socio-economic determinants of maternal health care utilization in Turkey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 50(12), pages 1797-1806, June.
    5. Duong, Dat V & Binns, Colin W & Lee, Andy H, 2004. "Utilization of delivery services at the primary health care level in rural Vietnam," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(12), pages 2585-2595, December.
    6. Sepehri, Ardeshir & Simpson, Wayne & Sarma, Sisira, 2006. "The influence of health insurance on hospital admission and length of stay--The case of Vietnam," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 63(7), pages 1757-1770, October.
    7. Ensor, Tim & Ronoh, Jeptepkeny, 2005. "Effective financing of maternal health services: A review of the literature," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 49-58, December.
    8. Chen, Chin-Shyan & Liu, Tsai-Ching & Chen, Li-Mei, 2003. "National Health Insurance and the antenatal care use: a case in Taiwan," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 99-112, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Alassane DRABO & Christian EBEKE, 2010. "Remittances, Public Health Spending and Foreign Aid in the Access to Health Care Services in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201004, CERDI.
    2. Saturnin Bertrand Nguenda Anya & Atanase Yene, 2016. "The determinants of the choice of treatment of pregnant women in Cameroon," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-9, December.
    3. Adjiwanou, Vissého & LeGrand, Thomas, 2013. "Does antenatal care matter in the use of skilled birth attendance in rural Africa: A multi-country analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 26-34.
    4. Guliani, Harminder & Sepehri, Ardeshir & Serieux, John, 2012. "What impact does contact with the prenatal care system have on women’s use of facility delivery? Evidence from low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1882-1890.
    5. Yusuke Kamiya, 2010. "Endogenous Women's Autonomy and the Use of Reproductive Health Services: Empirical Evidence from Tajikistan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 10E010, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    6. Shandana Dar & Uzma Afzal, 2015. "Education and Maternal Health in Pakistan: The Pathways of Influence," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 20(2), pages 1-34, July-Dec.
    7. Kruk, Margaret E. & Rockers, Peter C. & Mbaruku, Godfrey & Paczkowski, Magdalena M. & Galea, Sandro, 2010. "Community and health system factors associated with facility delivery in rural Tanzania: A multilevel analysis," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(2-3), pages 209-216, October.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:6:p:1009-1017. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/315/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.