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Endogenous Women's Autonomy and the Use of Reproductive Health Services: Empirical Evidence from Tajikistan

  • Yusuke Kamiya

    (Ph.D candidate, Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP))

Though gender equity is widely considered to be a key to improving maternal health in developing countries, little empirical evidence has been presented to support this claim. This paper investigates whether or not and how female autonomy within the household affects women's use of reproductive health care in Tajikistan, where the situation of maternal health and gender equity is worse compared with neighbouring countries. Estimation is performed using bivariate probit models in which woman's use of health services and the level of female autonomy are recursively and simultaneously determined. Empirical results reveal that female autonomy measured by women's decision-making on child wellbeing and on economic affairs within the household increases the probability of receiving both antenatal and delivery care. Policymakers need to address women's empowerment in the household in addition to implementing direct health interventions towards improvement of maternal health.

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File URL: http://www.osipp.osaka-u.ac.jp/archives/DP/2010/DP2010E010.pdf
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Paper provided by Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University in its series OSIPP Discussion Paper with number 10E010.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:osp:wpaper:10e010
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  1. Kaushik Basu, 2004. "Gender and Say A Model of Household Behavior with Endogenously-determined Balance of Power," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2054, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  2. Pushkar Maitra & Ranjan Ray, 2005. "The Impact Of Intra Household Balance Of Power On Expenditure Pattern: The Australian Evidence ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(1), pages 15-29, 03.
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  14. Gary S. Becker, 1981. "A Treatise on the Family," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number beck81-1, October.
  15. Shelah Bloom & David Wypij & Monica Gupta, 2001. "Dimensions of women’s autonomy and the influence on maternal health care utilization in a north indian city," Demography, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 67-78, February.
  16. Gage, Anastasia J., 2007. "Barriers to the utilization of maternal health care in rural Mali," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(8), pages 1666-1682, October.
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