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Frequency and timing of antenatal care in Kenya: explaining the variations between women of different communities

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  • Magadi, Monica Akinyi
  • Madise, Nyovani Janet
  • Rodrigues, Roberto Nascimento

Abstract

Appropriate antenatal care is important in identifying and mitigating risk factors in pregnancy but many mothers in the developing world do not receive such care. This paper uses data from the 1993 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey to study the variations in the use of antenatal services in Kenya. The analysis is based on modelling the frequency and timing of antenatal visits using three-level linear regression models. The results show that the use of antenatal care in Kenya is associated with a range of socio-economic, cultural and reproductive factors. The availability and accessibility of health services and the desirability of a pregnancy are also important. Use of antenatal care is infrequent for unwanted and mistimed pregnancies; even women who use antenatal care frequently appear to be less consistent if a pregnancy is mistimed. The results also indicate that women are highly consistent in the use of antenatal care during pregnancies. The intra-woman correlation coefficient for the frequency of antenatal visits ranges between 50% and 80% with greater correlation for wanted pregnancies to women in urban areas.

Suggested Citation

  • Magadi, Monica Akinyi & Madise, Nyovani Janet & Rodrigues, Roberto Nascimento, 2000. "Frequency and timing of antenatal care in Kenya: explaining the variations between women of different communities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(4), pages 551-561, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:51:y:2000:i:4:p:551-561
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    Cited by:

    1. Gyimah, Stephen Obeng & Takyi, Baffour K. & Addai, Isaac, 2006. "Challenges to the reproductive-health needs of African women: On religion and maternal health utilization in Ghana," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(12), pages 2930-2944, June.
    2. Ana Maria Osorio & Catalina Bolancé & Nyovani Madise, 2012. "Intermediary and structural determinants of early childhood health in Colombia: exploring the role of communities," Working Papers XREAP2012-13, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised Jun 2012.
    3. repec:eee:socmed:v:187:y:2017:i:c:p:39-48 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Chen, Chin-Shyan & Liu, Tsai-Ching & Chen, Li-Mei, 2003. "National Health Insurance and the antenatal care use: a case in Taiwan," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 99-112, April.
    5. Mbonye, Anthony Kabanza & Neema, Stella & Magnussen, Pascal, 2006. "Perceptions on use of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in pregnancy and the policy implications for malaria control in Uganda," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 279-289, August.
    6. Makate, Marshall, 2016. "Maternal health-seeking behavior and child’s birth order: Evidence from Malawi, Uganda, and Zimbabwe," MPRA Paper 72722, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Jul 2016.
    7. De Allegri, Manuela & Ridde, Valéry & Louis, Valérie R. & Sarker, Malabika & Tiendrebéogo, Justin & Yé, Maurice & Müller, Olaf & Jahn, Albrecht, 2011. "Determinants of utilisation of maternal care services after the reduction of user fees: A case study from rural Burkina Faso," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 210-218, March.
    8. Emily Smith-Greenaway & Christie Sennott, 2016. "Death and Desirability: Retrospective Reporting of Unintended Pregnancy After a Child’s Death," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(3), pages 805-834, June.
    9. Van Rijsbergen, Bart & D’Exelle, Ben, 2013. "Delivery Care in Tanzania: A Comparative Analysis of Use and Preferences," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 276-287.
    10. Sunil, T.S. & Rajaram, S. & Zottarelli, Lisa K., 2006. "Do individual and program factors matter in the utilization of maternal care services in rural India? A theoretical approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(8), pages 1943-1957, April.
    11. Kandala, Ngianga-Bakwin & Magadi, Monica Akinyi & Madise, Nyovani Janet, 2006. "An investigation of district spatial variations of childhood diarrhoea and fever morbidity in Malawi," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(5), pages 1138-1152, March.
    12. Mônica Viegas Andrade & Kenya Valéria M. de Souza Noronha & Abhishek Singh & Cristina Guimarães Rodrigues & Sabu S. Padmadas, 2011. "Equidade na utilização dos serviços de saúde no Brasil: um estudo comparativo entre as regiões brasileiras no período 1998-2008," Textos para Discussão Cedeplar-UFMG td446, Cedeplar, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.
    13. Trani, Jean-Francois & Browne, Joyce & Kett, Maria & Bah, Osman & Morlai, Teddy & Bailey, Nicki & Groce, Nora, 2011. "Access to health care, reproductive health and disability: A large scale survey in Sierra Leone," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(10), pages 1477-1489.
    14. Pokhrel, Subhash & Snow, Rachel & Dong, Hengjin & Hidayat, Budi & Flessa, Steffen & Sauerborn, Rainer, 2005. "Gender role and child health care utilization in Nepal," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 100-109, September.
    15. Nandini Thogarapalli & Paul Mkandawire & Joseph Kangmennaang & Isaac Luginaah & Godwin Arku, 2016. "Gestational age at first antenatal visit in Namibia," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 61(9), pages 1089-1097, December.
    16. McTavish, Sarah & Moore, Spencer & Harper, Sam & Lynch, John, 2010. "National female literacy, individual socio-economic status, and maternal health care use in sub-Saharan Africa," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(11), pages 1958-1963, December.
    17. Saturnin Bertrand Nguenda Anya & Atanase Yene, 2016. "The determinants of the choice of treatment of pregnant women in Cameroon," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 6(1), pages 1-9, December.
    18. Mistry, Ritesh & Galal, Osman & Lu, Michael, 2009. "Women's autonomy and pregnancy care in rural India: A contextual analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(6), pages 926-933, September.
    19. Smith, Kimberly V. & Sulzbach, Sara, 2008. "Community-based health insurance and access to maternal health services: Evidence from three West African countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(12), pages 2460-2473, June.
    20. Magadi, Monica Akinyi & Agwanda, Alfred O. & Obare, Francis O., 2007. "A comparative analysis of the use of maternal health services between teenagers and older mothers in sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS)," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 64(6), pages 1311-1325, March.
    21. Guliani, Harminder & Sepehri, Ardeshir & Serieux, John, 2012. "What impact does contact with the prenatal care system have on women’s use of facility delivery? Evidence from low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1882-1890.
    22. repec:hur:ijarbs:v:7:y:2017:i:9:p:477-520 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Gage, Anastasia J., 2007. "Barriers to the utilization of maternal health care in rural Mali," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(8), pages 1666-1682, October.
    24. Yusuke Kamiya, 2010. "Endogenous Women's Autonomy and the Use of Reproductive Health Services: Empirical Evidence from Tajikistan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 10E010, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.

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