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Working and Women’s Empowerment in the Egyptian Household: The Type of Work and Location Matter

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  • Clémentine Sadania

    (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - ECM - Ecole Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales)

Abstract

This paper explores the impact of women's work on empowerment in Egypt. Existing evidence suffers from several limitations, which I attempt to address. First, I develop an instrumental variable strategy to account for the endogeneity of work. Second, I allow for a heterogeneous impact of work, distinguishing between working in the public sector, outside work in the private sector and home-based work. Third, women's empowerment is directly measured as their participation in household decisions. Outside work has the greatest impact. Interestingly, home-based work enhances joint decision-making. Distinguishing between urban and rural residence reveals distinct patterns of impact on decision-making.

Suggested Citation

  • Clémentine Sadania, 2016. "Working and Women’s Empowerment in the Egyptian Household: The Type of Work and Location Matter," Working Papers halshs-01525220, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-01525220
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01525220
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mahe, Clotilde, 2017. "Husbands' return migration and wives' occupational choices," MERIT Working Papers 031, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Olivier Bargain & Delphine Boutin & Hugues Champeaux, 2018. "Women's political participation and intrahousehold empowerment: Evidence from the Egyptian Arab Spring," Working Papers halshs-01804380, HAL.

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    Keywords

    employment; women’s empowerment; household decision-making;

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