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Barriers to the utilization of maternal health care in rural Mali

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  • Gage, Anastasia J.

Abstract

This study used data from the 2001 Demographic and Health Survey and multilevel logistic regression models to examine area- and individual-level barriers to the utilization of maternal health services in rural Mali. The analysis highlights a range of area-level influences on the use made of maternal health services. While the dearth of health facilities was a barrier to receipt of prenatal care in the first trimester, transportation barriers were more important for four or more prenatal visits, and distance barriers for delivery assistance by trained medical personnel and institutional delivery. Women's odds of utilizing maternal health services were strongly influenced by the practices of others in their areas of residence and by living in close proximity to people with secondary or higher education. Household poverty and personal problems were negatively related to all outcomes considered. The results highlight the importance of antenatal care and counseling about pregnancy complications for increasing the likelihood of appropriate delivery care, particularly among women living 15-29Â km from a health facility. Area-level factors explained a greater proportion of the variation in delivery care than in prenatal care However, significant area variation in the utilization of maternal health services remained unexplained.

Suggested Citation

  • Gage, Anastasia J., 2007. "Barriers to the utilization of maternal health care in rural Mali," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 65(8), pages 1666-1682, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:65:y:2007:i:8:p:1666-1682
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Chitalu M. Chama-Chiliba and Steven F. Koch, 2014. "Assessing regional variation in the effect of the removal of user fees on institutional deliveries in rural Zambia," Working Papers 427, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    2. Makate, Marshall & Makate, Clifton, 2016. "The Evolution of Socioeconomic-Related Inequalities in Maternal Healthcare Utilization: Evidence from Zimbabwe, 1994-2011," MPRA Paper 83897, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 12 Jan 2018.
    3. Patience Aseweh Abor & Gordon Abekah-Nkrumah & Kojo Sakyi & Charles K.D. Adjasi & Joshua Abor, 2011. "The socio-economic determinants of maternal health care utilization in Ghana," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 38(7), pages 628-648, June.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:197:y:2018:i:c:p:104-115 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Alassane DRABO & Christian EBEKE, 2010. "Remittances, Public Health Spending and Foreign Aid in the Access to Health Care Services in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201004, CERDI.
    6. Guliani, Harminder & Sepehri, Ardeshir & Serieux, John, 2012. "What impact does contact with the prenatal care system have on women’s use of facility delivery? Evidence from low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(12), pages 1882-1890.
    7. Kruk, Margaret E. & Rockers, Peter C. & Mbaruku, Godfrey & Paczkowski, Magdalena M. & Galea, Sandro, 2010. "Community and health system factors associated with facility delivery in rural Tanzania: A multilevel analysis," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(2-3), pages 209-216, October.
    8. De Allegri, Manuela & Ridde, Valéry & Louis, Valérie R. & Sarker, Malabika & Tiendrebéogo, Justin & Yé, Maurice & Müller, Olaf & Jahn, Albrecht, 2011. "Determinants of utilisation of maternal care services after the reduction of user fees: A case study from rural Burkina Faso," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 210-218, March.
    9. Van Rijsbergen, Bart & D’Exelle, Ben, 2013. "Delivery Care in Tanzania: A Comparative Analysis of Use and Preferences," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 276-287.
    10. Lin, Yen-Ju & Tian, Wei-Hua & Chen, Chun-Chih, 2011. "Urbanization and the utilization of outpatient services under National Health Insurance in Taiwan," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 236-243.
    11. Trani, Jean-Francois & Browne, Joyce & Kett, Maria & Bah, Osman & Morlai, Teddy & Bailey, Nicki & Groce, Nora, 2011. "Access to health care, reproductive health and disability: A large scale survey in Sierra Leone," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(10), pages 1477-1489.
    12. Adjiwanou, Vissého & LeGrand, Thomas, 2013. "Does antenatal care matter in the use of skilled birth attendance in rural Africa: A multi-country analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 26-34.
    13. Masters, Samuel H. & Burstein, Roy & Amofah, George & Abaogye, Patrick & Kumar, Santosh & Hanlon, Michael, 2013. "Travel time to maternity care and its effect on utilization in rural Ghana: A multilevel analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 147-154.
    14. Yusuke Kamiya, 2010. "Endogenous Women's Autonomy and the Use of Reproductive Health Services: Empirical Evidence from Tajikistan," OSIPP Discussion Paper 10E010, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    15. Pierce, Hayley & Heaton, Tim B. & Hoffmann, John, 2014. "Increasing maternal healthcare use in Rwanda: Implications for child nutrition and survival," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 61-67.

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