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The comovement between exchange rates and stock prices in the Asian emerging markets

  • Lin, Chien-Hsiu
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    This study investigates the comovement between exchange rates and stock prices in the Asian emerging markets. The sample covers major institutional changes, such as market liberalization and financial crises, so as to examine how the short-term and long-term relations change after such events. The autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) model proposed by Pesaran et al. (2001) is adopted, which allows us to deal with structural breaks easily, and to handle data that have integrals of different orders. Interest rates and foreign reserves are also included in the analysis to reduce potential omitted variable bias. My empirical results suggest that the comovement between exchange rates and stock prices becomes stronger during crisis periods, consistent with contagion or spillover between asset prices, when compared with tranquil periods. Furthermore, most of the spillovers during crisis periods can be attributed to the channel running from stock price shocks to the exchange rate, suggesting that governments should stimulate economic growth and stock markets to attract capital inflow, thereby preventing a currency crisis. However, the industry causality analysis shows the comovement is not stronger for export-oriented industries for all periods, such as industrials and technology industries, thus implying that comovement between exchange rates and stock prices in the Asian emerging markets is generally driven by capital account balance rather than that of trade.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1059056011001122
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Review of Economics & Finance.

    Volume (Year): 22 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 161-172

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:reveco:v:22:y:2012:i:1:p:161-172
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620165

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