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Credit where credit is due? The impact of project contributions and social factors on authorship and inventorship

  • Haeussler, Carolin
  • Sauermann, Henry

We examine the extent to which different types of substantive project contributions as well as social factors predict whether a scientist is named as author on a paper and inventor on a patent resulting from the same project. Using unique survey data from over 2000 life scientists, we find that the predictors of authorship differ from those of inventorship. A wider range of project contributions may result in authorship, and social factors appear to play a larger role in authorship decisions than in inventorship decisions. We also find evidence that project contributions and social factors interact in predicting authorship, suggesting that the two sets of factors should be considered jointly rather than seen as independent determinants of attribution. In addition to providing novel insights into the functioning of the authorship and inventorship system, our results have important implications for administrators, managers, and policy makers, as well as for innovation scholars who often rely on patents and publications as measures of scientists’ performance.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research Policy.

Volume (Year): 42 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 688-703

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Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:42:y:2013:i:3:p:688-703
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/respol

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