IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

An analytical model for the formation of economic clusters

Listed author(s):
  • Chincarini, Ludwig
  • Asherie, Neer
Registered author(s):

    A simple spatial economy derived from microeconomic foundations is presented to gain insight into the formation of economic clusters. In this model, the formation of economic clusters is a consequence of the competition between economic forces that are consistent with atomistic agents maximizing their utility. An analytic approach is used to obtain the evolution of economic clusters. With this approach, the number of clusters which will grow can be predicted. These results are derived in the traditional one-dimensional geometry and extended to the more realistic two-dimensional landscape.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0166-0462(08)00007-0
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Regional Science and Urban Economics.

    Volume (Year): 38 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 252-270

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:38:y:2008:i:3:p:252-270
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/regec

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. Paul Krugman, 1994. "Fluctuations, Instability, and Agglomeration," NBER Working Papers 4616, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Y Ioannides & Henry Overman, 2000. "Spatial Evolution of the US Urban System," CEP Discussion Papers dp0482, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Victor D. Norman & Anthony J. Venables, 2004. "Industrial Clusters: Equilibrium, Welfare and Policy," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 71(284), pages 543-558, November.
    4. Quah, Danny, 2002. "Spatial Agglomeration Dynamics," CEPR Discussion Papers 3208, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Yannis M. Ioannides, 2004. "Topologies Of Social Interactions," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 287, Econometric Society.
    6. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Miren Lafourcade, 2005. "Transport costs: measures, determinants, and regional policy implications for France," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 319-349, June.
    7. Philip McCann, 2005. "Transport costs and new economic geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(3), pages 305-318, June.
    8. Dixit, Avinash K & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1977. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 297-308, June.
    9. Michael Roos, 2001. "How important is geography for agglomeration?," Discussion Papers in Economics 01_09, University of Dortmund, Department of Economics.
    10. J.Peter Neary, 2001. "Of Hype and Hyperbolas: Introducing the New Economic Geography," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 536-561, June.
    11. Antonio Ciccone & Robert E. Hall, 1995. "Productivity and the density of economic activity," Economics Working Papers 120, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    12. Allen J. Scott, 2004. "A Perspective of Economic Geography," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(5), pages 479-499, November.
    13. Glenn Ellison & Edward L. Glaeser, 1994. "Geographic Concentration in U.S. Manufacturing Industries: A Dartboard Approach," NBER Working Papers 4840, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Krugman, Paul, 1995. "Innovation and agglomeration: Two parables suggested by city-size distributions," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 371-390, November.
    15. Baldwin, Richard, 1998. "Agglomeration and Endogenous Capital," CEPR Discussion Papers 1845, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    16. Tabuchi, Takatoshi & Thisse, Jacques-Fran├žois & Zeng, Dao-Zhi, 2002. "On the Number and Size of Cities," CEPR Discussion Papers 3386, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    17. Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 1996. "The role of ports in the making of major cities: Self-agglomeration and hub-effect," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 93-120, April.
    18. Harrigan, James & Venables, Anthony J., 2006. "Timeliness and agglomeration," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(2), pages 300-316, March.
    19. Danny Quah, 2002. "Spatial agglomeration dynamics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2042, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    20. Danny Quah, 2002. "Spatial Agglomeration Dynamics," CEP Discussion Papers dp0521, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:regeco:v:38:y:2008:i:3:p:252-270. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.