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The role of ports in the making of major cities: Self-agglomeration and hub-effect

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  • Fujita, Masahisa
  • Mori, Tomoya

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  • Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 1996. "The role of ports in the making of major cities: Self-agglomeration and hub-effect," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 93-120, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:49:y:1996:i:1:p:93-120
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fujita, Masahisa & Mori, Tomoya, 1997. "Structural stability and evolution of urban systems," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4-5), pages 399-442, August.
    2. Schweizer, Urs & Varaiya, Pravin, 1976. "The spatial structure of production with a Leontief technology," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 231-251, September.
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