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Spatial agglomeration dynamics

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  • Quah, Danny

Abstract

This paper develops a model of economic growth and activity locating endogenously on a 3- dimensional featureless global geography. The same economic forces influence simultaneously growth, convergence, and spatial agglomeration and clustering. Economic activity is not concentrated on discrete isolated points but instead a dynamically- fluctuating, smooth spatial distribution. Spatial inequality is a Cass-Koopmans saddlepath, and the global distribution of economic activity converges towards egalitarian growth. Equality is stable but spatial inequality is needed to attain it.

Suggested Citation

  • Quah, Danny, 2002. "Spatial agglomeration dynamics," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2042, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:2042
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/2042/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Desmet & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2014. "Spatial Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(4), pages 1211-1243, April.
    2. Brock, William A. & Xepapadeas, Anastasios & Yannacopoulos, Athanasios N., 2014. "Spatial externalities and agglomeration in a competitive industry," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 143-174.
    3. Chincarini, Ludwig & Asherie, Neer, 2008. "An analytical model for the formation of economic clusters," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 252-270, May.
    4. Giorgio Fabbri, 2015. "Ecological barriers and convergence: a note on geometry in spatial growth models," Working Papers hal-01159253, HAL.
    5. Matthias Cinyabuguma & Virginia McConnell, 2009. "Urban Growth Externalities and Neighborhood Incentives: Another Cause of Urban Sprawl?," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 09-106, UMBC Department of Economics.
    6. Orlando Gomes, 2007. "Space, growth and technology: an integrated dynamic approach," Studies in Economics and Finance, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 24(4), pages 248-265, October.
    7. Zakaria Babutsidze & Robin Cowan, 2014. "Showing or telling? Local interaction and organization of behavior," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer;Society for Economic Science with Heterogeneous Interacting Agents, vol. 9(2), pages 151-181, October.
    8. Giorgio Fabbri, 2014. "Ecological Barriers and Convergence: A Note on Geometry in Spatial Growth Models," Documents de recherche 14-05, Centre d'Études des Politiques Économiques (EPEE), Université d'Evry Val d'Essonne.
    9. Brock, William A. & Xepapadeas, Anastasios & Yannacopoulos, Athanasios N., 2014. "Optimal agglomerations in dynamic economics," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 1-15.
    10. Fabbri, Giorgio, 2016. "Geographical structure and convergence: A note on geometry in spatial growth models," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 114-136.
    11. Anastasios Xepapadeas, 2010. "Modeling complex systems," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(s1), pages 181-191, November.
    12. Keller, Wolfgang & Shiue, Carol H., 2007. "The origin of spatial interaction," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 304-332, September.
    13. Schwartz Dafna & Bar-El Raphael & Malul Miki, 2008. "A Joint Virtual Advanced Technology Incubator - A New Pattern of Israeli-Palestinian Economic Cooperation," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 14(2), pages 1-19, July.
    14. Klaus Desmet & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2010. "On Spatial Dynamics," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 43-63.
    15. Orlando Gomes, 2004. "Location Dynamics and Knowledge Agglomeration," Urban/Regional 0409012, EconWPA.
    16. Tuan, Chyau & Ng, Linda Fung-Yee, 2007. "The place of FDI in China's regional economic development: Emergence of the globalized delta economies," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 348-364, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cluster; continuous space; convergence; distribution dynamics; growth; knowledge; saddlepath dynamics; spatial spillovers; spatial inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • D30 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - General
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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