IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

The extreme-value dependence of Asia-Pacific equity markets


  • Bekiros, Stelios D.
  • Georgoutsos, Dimitris A.


In this paper we study the dependence structure of extreme realization of returns between seven Asia-Pacific stock markets and the U.S. Methodologically we apply the multivariate extreme value theory that best suits to the problem under investigation. The evidence we obtain indicates that extreme correlations are not substantially different from the unconditional ones or from those obtained from multivariate GARCH models. A clustering analysis shows that the Asia-Pacific countries do not belong to a distinct block of countries on the basis of the extreme correlations we have estimated. The policy implications of our study are that the benefits from portfolio diversification with assets from the Asia-Pacific stock markets are not eroded during crisis periods, in the sense that no correlation breakdown has been observed.

Suggested Citation

  • Bekiros, Stelios D. & Georgoutsos, Dimitris A., 2008. "The extreme-value dependence of Asia-Pacific equity markets," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 197-208, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:mulfin:v:18:y:2008:i:3:p:197-208

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. King, Mervyn A & Wadhwani, Sushil, 1990. "Transmission of Volatility between Stock Markets," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 5-33.
    2. Gencay, Ramazan & Selcuk, Faruk, 2004. "Extreme value theory and Value-at-Risk: Relative performance in emerging markets," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 287-303.
    3. Rigobon, Roberto, 2003. "On the measurement of the international propagation of shocks: is the transmission stable?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 261-283, December.
    4. G. Andrew Karolyi, 2004. "Does International Financial Contagion Really Exist?," Journal of Applied Corporate Finance, Morgan Stanley, vol. 16(2-3), pages 136-146.
    5. Jesus Gonzalo, 2004. "Which Extreme Values Are Really Extreme?," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 2(3), pages 349-369.
    6. Bekaert, Geert & Harvey, Campbell R., 2003. "Emerging markets finance," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1-2), pages 3-56, February.
    7. Tae-Hwy Lee & Yong Bao & Burak Saltoglu, 2006. "Evaluating predictive performance of value-at-risk models in emerging markets: a reality check," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(2), pages 101-128.
    8. Fran├žois Longin, 2001. "Extreme Correlation of International Equity Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(2), pages 649-676, April.
    9. Ser-Huang Poon, 2004. "Extreme Value Dependence in Financial Markets: Diagnostics, Models, and Financial Implications," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 17(2), pages 581-610.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Marco Rocco, 2011. "Extreme value theory for finance: a survey," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 99, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    2. Dungey, Mardi & Milunovich, George & Thorp, Susan, 2010. "Unobservable shocks as carriers of contagion," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 1008-1021, May.
    3. Yue Peng & Wing Ng, 2012. "Analysing financial contagion and asymmetric market dependence with volatility indices via copulas," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 49-74, February.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:mulfin:v:18:y:2008:i:3:p:197-208. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.