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A silver lining to white flight? White suburbanization and African–American homeownership, 1940–1980

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  • Boustan, Leah P.
  • Margo, Robert A.

Abstract

Between 1940 and 1980, the homeownership rate among metropolitan African–American households increased by 27 percentage points. Nearly three-quarters of this increase occurred in central cities. We show that rising black homeownership in central cities was facilitated by the movement of white households to the suburban ring, which reduced the price of urban housing units conducive to owner-occupancy. Our OLS and IV estimates imply that 26 percent of the national increase in black homeownership over the period is explained by white suburbanization.

Suggested Citation

  • Boustan, Leah P. & Margo, Robert A., 2013. "A silver lining to white flight? White suburbanization and African–American homeownership, 1940–1980," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 71-80.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:juecon:v:78:y:2013:i:c:p:71-80
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jue.2013.08.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Battaglia, Marianna & Chabé-Ferret, Bastien & Lebedinski, Lara, 2017. "Segregation and Fertility: The Case of the Roma in Serbia," IZA Discussion Papers 10929, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Gobillon, Laurent & Solignac, Matthieu, 2015. "Homeownership of immigrants in France: selection effects related to international migration flows," CEPR Discussion Papers 10975, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Rosenthal, Stuart S. & Ross, Stephen L., 2015. "Change and Persistence in the Economic Status of Neighborhoods and Cities," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, Elsevier.
    4. Jeffrey Zabel, 2014. "Unintended Consequences: The Impact of Proposition 2½ Overrides on School Segregation in Massachusetts," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 9(4), pages 481-514, October.
    5. Laurent Gobillon & Matthieu Solignac, 2015. "Homeownership of immigrants in France: selection effects related to international migration flows," Working Papers halshs-01233069, HAL.
    6. Ran Abramitzky, 2015. "Economics and the Modern Economic Historian," NBER Working Papers 21636, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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