IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jobhdp/v121y2013i1p104-117.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The role of epistemic motivation in individuals’ response to decision complexity

Author

Listed:
  • Amit, Adi
  • Sagiv, Lilach

Abstract

Integrating findings on the effects of more alternatives with findings on the effects of more attributes, we offer a motivational decision-making model, suggesting that epistemic motivation moderates individuals’ responses to complex information. Study 1 empirically investigated the shared essence of four conceptualizations of epistemic motivation, further distinguishing it from the maximizing/satisficing motivation. A series of experiments indicate that epistemic motivation moderates the effect of complex information on one’s discomfort with a decision (Studies 2–4) and on the tendency to implement one’s choice in action (Study 3). Taken together, our findings indicate that individuals with low epistemic motivation experience more discomfort and are less likely to implement their decision when faced with complex information whereas those high on epistemic motivation portray a weaker or even an opposite effect. The consistent findings across conceptualizations (dispositional Need-for-Cognitive-Closure and manipulated Openness vs. Conservation values) indicate the robustness of the findings and the important role of epistemic motivation in complex decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Amit, Adi & Sagiv, Lilach, 2013. "The role of epistemic motivation in individuals’ response to decision complexity," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 104-117.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:121:y:2013:i:1:p:104-117
    DOI: 10.1016/j.obhdp.2013.01.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749597813000162
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. De Dreu, Carsten K. W., 2003. "Time pressure and closing of the mind in negotiation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 280-295, July.
    2. Mick, David Glen & Fournier, Susan, 1998. " Paradoxes of Technology: Consumer Cognizance, Emotions, and Coping Strategies," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 123-143, September.
    3. Mayseless, Ofra & Kruglanski, Arie W., 1987. "What makes you so sure? Effects of epistemic motivations on judgmental confidence," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 162-183, April.
    4. Tsiros, Michael & Mittal, Vikas, 2000. " Regret: A Model of Its Antecedents and Consequences in Consumer Decision Making," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(4), pages 401-417, March.
    5. Bettman, James R & Luce, Mary Frances & Payne, John W, 1998. " Constructive Consumer Choice Processes," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(3), pages 187-217, December.
    6. Vermeir, Iris & Van Kenhove, Patrick & Hendrickx, Hendrik, 2002. "The influence of need for closure on consumer's choice behaviour," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 703-727, December.
    7. Dmitri Kuksov & J. Miguel Villas-Boas, 2010. "When More Alternatives Lead to Less Choice," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 29(3), pages 507-524, 05-06.
    8. Carmon, Ziv & Wertenbroch, Klaus & Zeelenberg, Marcel, 2003. " Option Attachment: When Deliberating Makes Choosing Feel Like Losing," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(1), pages 15-29, June.
    9. Malhotra, Naresh K, 1982. " Information Load and Consumer Decision Making," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(4), pages 419-430, March.
    10. John T. Gourville & Dilip Soman, 2005. "Overchoice and Assortment Type: When and Why Variety Backfires," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 24(3), pages 382-395, July.
    11. Levin, Irwin P. & Huneke, Mary E. & Jasper, J. D., 2000. "Information Processing at Successive Stages of Decision Making: Need for Cognition and Inclusion-Exclusion Effects," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 171-193, July.
    12. Mantel, Susan Powell & Kardes, Frank R, 1999. " The Role of Direction of Comparison, Attribute-Based Processing, and Attitude-Based Processing in Consumer Preference," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(4), pages 335-352, March.
    13. Jacoby, Jacob, 1984. " Perspectives on Information Overload," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 432-435, March.
    14. Chernev, Alexander, 2003. " When More Is Less and Less Is More: The Role of Ideal Point Availability and Assortment in Consumer Choice," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(2), pages 170-183, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kanfer, Ruth & Chen, Gilad, 2016. "Motivation in organizational behavior: History, advances and prospects," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 6-19.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:121:y:2013:i:1:p:104-117. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.