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Dazed and confused by choice: How the temporal costs of choice freedom lead to undesirable outcomes

  • Botti, Simona
  • Hsee, Christopher K.
Registered author(s):

    We propose that individuals underestimate the costs of making choices relative to the benefits of finding the best option. Specifically, we demonstrate that research participants make systematic mistakes in predicting the effect of having more, vs. less, choice freedom on task performance and task-induced affect. Even when participants have the information to understand that the costs of choice freedom outweigh its benefits, they still predict that choice freedom will lead to better performance and more positive affect. As a result, those who have the option to choose exercise it, yet end up performing worse and feeling worse than those who do not have that option.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6WP2-4YW9D67-1/2/d2b36d32d3f3ee7cff111737b36df437
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 112 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 161-171

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:112:y:2010:i:2:p:161-171
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

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