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The culturally intelligent negotiator: The impact of cultural intelligence (CQ) on negotiation sequences and outcomes

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  • Imai, Lynn
  • Gelfand, Michele J.

Abstract

Although scholars and practitioners have repeatedly touted the importance of negotiating effectively across cultures, paradoxically, little research has addressed what predicts intercultural negotiation effectiveness. In this research, we examined the impact of cultural intelligence (CQ) on intercultural negotiation processes and outcomes, controlling for other types of intelligence (cognitive ability and emotional intelligence), personality (openness and extraversion), and international experience. Transcripts of 124 American and East Asian negotiators were coded for sequences of integrative information behaviors and cooperative relationship management behaviors. CQ measured a week prior to negotiations predicted the extent to which negotiators sequenced integrative information behaviors, which in turn predicted joint profit, over and beyond other individual differences. Additional analyses revealed that the level of integrative sequencing was more a function of the lower-scoring than the higher-scoring negotiator within the dyad. Other individual difference characteristics were not related to effective intercultural negotiation processes. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Imai, Lynn & Gelfand, Michele J., 2010. "The culturally intelligent negotiator: The impact of cultural intelligence (CQ) on negotiation sequences and outcomes," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 112(2), pages 83-98, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:112:y:2010:i:2:p:83-98
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John L. Graham, 1985. "Cross-Cultural Marketing Negotiations: A Laboratory Experiment," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 4(2), pages 130-146.
    2. Nancy J Adler & John L Graham, 1989. "Cross-Cultural Interaction: The International Comparison Fallacy?," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 20(3), pages 515-537, September.
    3. O'Connor, Kathleen M. & Arnold, Josh A., 2001. "Distributive Spirals: Negotiation Impasses and the Moderating Role of Disputant Self-Efficacy," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 84(1), pages 148-176, January.
    4. Catherine H Tinsley & Madan M Pillutla, 1998. "Negotiating in the United States and Hong Kong," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 29(4), pages 711-727, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chua, Roy Y.J. & Morris, Michael W. & Mor, Shira, 2012. "Collaborating across cultures: Cultural metacognition and affect-based trust in creative collaboration," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 116-131.
    2. Ott, Ursula F. & Prowse, Peter & Fells, Ray & Rogers, Helen, 2016. "The DNA of negotiations as a set theoretic concept: A theoretical and empirical analysis," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 69(9), pages 3561-3571.
    3. Yates, J. Frank & de Oliveira, Stephanie, 2016. "Culture and decision making," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 106-118.

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