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Asymmetric exchange rate pass-through: Evidence from major countries

  • Delatte, Anne-Laure
  • López-Villavicencio, Antonia

The aim of this paper is to investigate the asymmetric effect of exchange rate variations on prices over the short- and long-run in four major developed countries. To this end, we estimate a mark-up model for prices using a novel and simple asymmetric cointegrating model, with positive and negative partial sum decomposition of the nominal exchange rates. Our results show that prices react differently to appreciations and depreciations over the long-run, an effect that was previously ignored in the literature. In particular, we provide evidence that depreciations are passed through prices more than appreciations, a result that might suggest weak competition structures. This result has important implications for the proper conduct of monetary policy.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 833-844

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:34:y:2012:i:3:p:833-844
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622617

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