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Trade agreements, bargaining and economic growth

  • Maoz, Yishay D.
  • Peled, Dan
  • Sarid, Assaf

Rebelo's two-sector endogenous growth model is embedded within a two-country international trade framework. The two countries bargain over a trade agreement that specifies: (i) the size of the foreign aid that the richer country gives to the poorer one; (ii) the terms of the international trade that takes place after the aid is given. Foreign aid is given not because of generosity, but because it improves the capital allocation across the world and thus raises total world production. This world production surplus enables the rich country to raise its equilibrium consumption and welfare beyond their no-aid levels. To ensure it, the rich country uses a trade agreement to condition the aid on favorable terms of trade.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 33 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 92-101

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:33:y:2011:i:1:p:92-101
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  1. Sergio T. Rebelo, 1990. "Long Run Policy Analysis and Long Run Growth," NBER Working Papers 3325, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Alesina, Alberto & Dollar, David, 2000. " Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 33-63, March.
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  9. Devereux, Michael B, 1997. "Growth, Specialization, and Trade Liberalization," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 38(3), pages 565-85, August.
  10. Robert Hunter Wade, 2003. "What strategies are viable for developing countries today? The World Trade Organization and the shrinking of ‘development space’," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 28239, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  11. Mayer, Wolfgang, 1981. "Theoretical Considerations on Negotiated Tariff Adjustments," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 33(1), pages 135-53, March.
  12. Felbermayr, Gabriel, 2007. "Specialization on a technologically stagnant sector need not be bad for growth," Munich Reprints in Economics 20645, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  13. Lahiri, Sajal & Raimondos-Moller, Pascalis & Wong, Kar-yiu & Woodland, Alan D., 2002. "Optimal foreign aid and tariffs," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 79-99, February.
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  16. Daniel Cohen & Pierre Jacquet & Helmut Reisen, 2006. "After Gleneagles: What Role for Loans in ODA?," OECD Development Centre Policy Briefs 31, OECD Publishing.
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