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House prices, collateral constraint, and the asymmetric effect on consumption

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  • Chen, Nan-Kuang
  • Chen, Shiu-Sheng
  • Chou, Yu-Hsi

Abstract

This paper investigates the asymmetric effect of house prices on various categories of consumption under constrained and unconstrained regimes. We first present a simple theoretical model based on Iacoviello (2004) and Luengo-Prado (2006), explicitly considering the dual role of housing and linking credit constraints to the behavior of consumption in a pair of aggregate Euler equations. We then estimate a threshold regression model and find that LC-PIH holds only under the unconstrained regime. More importantly, durable consumption exhibit a very strong asymmetric effect in response to changes in house prices, while other categories of consumption do not exhibit this asymmetry.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Nan-Kuang & Chen, Shiu-Sheng & Chou, Yu-Hsi, 2010. "House prices, collateral constraint, and the asymmetric effect on consumption," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 26-37, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhouse:v:19:y:2010:i:1:p:26-37
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Amina Ahec Šonje & Anita Ceh Casni & Maruška Vizek, 2012. "Does housing wealth affect private consumption in European post-transition countries? Evidence from linear and threshold models," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 73-85, June.
    2. Stanimira Milcheva, 2012. "Monetary policy, financial intermediation, current account and housing market - how do they fit together?," ERES eres2012_151, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    3. LEUNG, K. Y. Charles & TANG, C. H. Edward, 2011. "Comparing two financial crises: the case of Hong Kong real estate markets," MPRA Paper 31562, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Beatrice D. Simo-Kengne & Rangan Gupta & Manoel Bittencourt, 2013. "The Impact of House Prices on Consumption in South Africa: Evidence from Provincial-Level Panel VARs," Housing Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(8), pages 1133-1154, November.
    5. Tomas Havranek & Anna Sokolova, 2016. "Do Consumers Really Follow a Rule of Thumb? Three Thousand Estimates from 130 Studies Say “Probably Not”," Working Papers IES 2016/15, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2016.
    6. Mustafa Kilinc & Cengiz Tunc, 2013. "Turkiye’de Goreli Konut Deflatoru," CBT Research Notes in Economics 1314, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    7. Tsung-Hsien Michael Lee & Wenjuan Chen, 2015. "Is There an Asymmetric Impact of Housing on Output?," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2015-020, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    8. Leung, Charles Ka Yui & Chow, Kenneth & Yiu, Matthew & Tam, Dickson, 2010. "House Market in Chinese Cities: Dynamic Modeling, In-Sampling Fitting and Out-of-Sample Forecasting," MPRA Paper 27367, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Benedetto Manganelli & Francesco Tajani, 2015. "Macroeconomic Variables and Real Estate in Italy and in the usa," SCIENZE REGIONALI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2015(3), pages 31-48.

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