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Intimate partner violence and help-seeking: The role of femicide news

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  • Colagrossi, Marco
  • Deiana, Claudio
  • Dragone, Davide
  • Geraci, Andrea
  • Giua, Ludovica
  • Iori, Elisa

Abstract

Exploiting high-frequency data from the Italian anti-violence helpline, police reports of domestic abuse and maltreatments, and a unique geolocalized dataset on killings of women, we show that the news coverage of a femicide triggers an increase in help-seeking behavior. The effect is detectable in the period following the news and in the province where the femicide has occurred. Additionally, help-seeking increases more when the general interest and news coverage are higher. These findings are consistent with a model in which femicide news increase expectations about future intimate partner violence in case no action is taken. Our results imply that recurrent information campaigns and public discussion can foster help-seeking from survivors of gender-based violence.

Suggested Citation

  • Colagrossi, Marco & Deiana, Claudio & Dragone, Davide & Geraci, Andrea & Giua, Ludovica & Iori, Elisa, 2023. "Intimate partner violence and help-seeking: The role of femicide news," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:87:y:2023:i:c:s0167629622001369
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2022.102722
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender-based violence; Helpline; Intimate partner violence; Physical violence; Psychological violence; Sexual violence;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure

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