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The impact of Medicaid insurance coverage on dental service use


  • Choi, Moonkyung Kate


The new comprehensive health reform, beginning in 2014, will require Medicaid to expand all elements of coverage to individuals with incomes up to 133 percent of the federal poverty line. With millions more individuals gaining eligibility for adult Medicaid dental benefits, generating an unbiased estimate of the elasticity of demand for dental services is critical.

Suggested Citation

  • Choi, Moonkyung Kate, 2011. "The impact of Medicaid insurance coverage on dental service use," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1020-1031.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:30:y:2011:i:5:p:1020-1031
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2011.08.002

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Janet Currie & Jonathan Gruber, 1996. "Health Insurance Eligibility, Utilization of Medical Care, and Child Health," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 431-466.
    2. Sherry Glied & Matthew Neidell, 2010. "The Economic Value of Teeth," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
    3. Stephen G. Donald & Kevin Lang, 2007. "Inference with Difference-in-Differences and Other Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 221-233, May.
    4. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    5. Leo Turcotte & John Robst & Solomon Polachek, 2005. "Medicaid Coverage and Medical Interventions During Pregnancy," International Journal of Health Economics and Management, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 255-271, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lipton, Brandy J. & Decker, Sandra L., 2016. "The effect of Medicaid adult vision coverage on the likelihood of appropriate correction of distance vision: Evidence from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 150(C), pages 258-267.
    2. Wing, Coady & Marier, Allison, 2014. "Effects of occupational regulations on the cost of dental services: Evidence from dental insurance claims," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 131-143.
    3. Ferman, Bruno & Pinto, Cristine, 2015. "Inference in Differences-in-Differences with Few Treated Groups and Heteroskedasticity," MPRA Paper 67665, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Lipton, Brandy J. & Decker, Sandra L., 2015. "The effect of health insurance coverage on medical care utilization and health outcomes: Evidence from Medicaid adult vision benefits," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 320-332.
    5. Decker, Sandra L. & Lipton, Brandy J., 2015. "Do Medicaid benefit expansions have teeth? The effect of Medicaid adult dental coverage on the use of dental services and oral health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 212-225.
    6. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Sarah Miller & Marko Vujicic, 2014. "How Do Providers Respond to Public Health Insurance Expansions? Evidence from Adult Medicaid Dental Benefits," NBER Working Papers 20053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Joshua C. Hall & Brad R. Humphreys & Jane E. Ruseski, 2015. "Economic Freedom and Participation in Physical Activity," Working Papers 15-17, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
    8. Thomas Buchmueller & John C. Ham & Lara D. Shore-Sheppard, 2015. "The Medicaid Program," NBER Chapters,in: Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, volume 1, pages 21-136 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Thomas Buchmueller & Sarah Miller & Marko Vujicic, 2016. "How Do Providers Respond to Changes in Public Health Insurance Coverage? Evidence from Adult Medicaid Dental Benefits," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 8(4), pages 70-102, November.

    More about this item


    Dental market; Demand for dental services; Medicaid; Difference-in-differences;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs


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