IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/jfpoli/v68y2017icp206-213.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The economic impact of the Food and Drug Administration’s Final Juice HACCP Rule

Author

Listed:
  • Minor, Travis
  • Parrett, Matt

Abstract

Using 1998–2008 data collected by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on foodborne illnesses and outbreaks, we examine the economic impact of the Food and Drug Administration’s final rule titled “Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP); Procedures for the Safe and Sanitary Processing and Importing of Juice” (the Final Juice Rule). Using a difference-in-differences approach, we find that the rule led to an annual reduction of between 462 and 508 foodborne illnesses associated with juice-bearing products. Furthermore, our reevaluated estimate of the rule’s benefits compares favorably to its estimated cost.

Suggested Citation

  • Minor, Travis & Parrett, Matt, 2017. "The economic impact of the Food and Drug Administration’s Final Juice HACCP Rule," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 206-213.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:206-213
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2017.02.008
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306919217301501
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Travis Minor & Matt Parrett, 2016. "A retrospective review of the economic impact of the food and drug administration's proposed egg rule," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(4), pages 457-464, July.
    2. Herzfeld, Thomas & Drescher, Larissa S. & Grebitus, Carola, 2011. "Cross-national adoption of private food quality standards," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 401-411, June.
    3. Shepherd, Ben & Wilson, Norbert L.W., 2013. "Product standards and developing country agricultural exports: The case of the European Union," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 1-10.
    4. Solomon Asfaw & Dagmar Mithöfer & Hermann Waibel, 2010. "Agrifood supply chain, private-sector standards, and farmers' health: evidence from Kenya," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 41(3-4), pages 251-263, May.
    5. Melo, Oscar & Engler, Alejandra & Nahuehual, Laura & Cofre, Gabriela & Barrena, José, 2014. "Do Sanitary, Phytosanitary, and Quality-related Standards Affect International Trade? Evidence from Chilean Fruit Exports," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 350-359.
    6. Ferro, Esteban & Otsuki, Tsunehiro & Wilson, John S., 2015. "The effect of product standards on agricultural exports," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 68-79.
    7. Lan Liu & Chengyan Yue, 2012. "Investigating the impact of SPS standards on trade using a VES model," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 39(3), pages 511-528, July.
    8. Jongwanich, Juthathip, 2009. "Impact of Food Safety Standards on Processed Food Exports from Developing Countries," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 154, Asian Development Bank.
    9. Anders, Sven M. & Caswell, Julie A., 2008. "AJAE Appendix for Standards as Barriers versus Standards as Catalysts: Assessing the Impact of HACCP Implementation on U.S. Seafood Imports," American Journal of Agricultural Economics APPENDICES, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(2), pages 1-3, August.
    10. Jongwanich, Juthathip, 2009. "The impact of food safety standards on processed food exports from developing countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 447-457, October.
    11. Schuster, Monica & Maertens, Miet, 2015. "The Impact of Private Food Standards on Developing Countries’ Export Performance: An Analysis of Asparagus Firms in Peru," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 208-221.
    12. Julius J. Okello & Scott M. Swinton, 2010. "From Circle of Poison to Circle of Virtue: Pesticides, Export Standards and Kenya's Green Bean Farmers," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 209-224.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:agfoec:v:5:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40100-017-0080-2 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foodborne illness; Juice; Regulation; HACCP;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:206-213. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.