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Up-or-out policies when a worker imitates another

  • Glazer, Amihai

A worker's productivity may increase if he imitates another worker he believes had performed well. The benefits of imitation can lead a firm to adopt up-or-out rules, and to pay senior workers more than junior workers, though observed differences in productivity are small.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 84 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 432-438

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:84:y:2012:i:1:p:432-438
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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