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Perceptions, intentions, and cheating

Listed author(s):
  • Hao, Li
  • Houser, Daniel
Registered author(s):

    We report data from a laboratory experiment demonstrating that having to announce one’s own future possibly dishonest actions can deter misconduct. Further, results from independent evaluators suggest that a possibly dishonest action taken after it is announced is more likely to be perceived as dishonest than an equivalent action absent the announcement. Consequently, requiring announcements promotes honest actions among people who care about maintaining an honest self-image. Finally, a type-classification analysis shows that the mixture of “maximum cheating” and “honest” types best characterize the cheating behavior, suggesting that “incomplete cheating” reported in the literature is not an intrinsic preference for being honest, but may rather be due to a preference for appearing honest.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268116302335
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

    Volume (Year): 133 (2017)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 52-73

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:133:y:2017:i:c:p:52-73
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2016.10.010
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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    23. repec:feb:framed:0087 is not listed on IDEAS
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