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Audit rates and compliance: A field experiment in care provision

Listed author(s):
  • Lindeboom, Maarten
  • van der Klaauw, Bas
  • Vriend, Sandra

We provide evidence from a large-scale field experiment on the causal effects of audit regimes on compliance in a market for immediate (home and nursing) care. In this setting care should be provided quickly and, therefore, the gatekeeper introduced ex-post auditing. Our results do not show significant effects of variations in audit regimes with different unconditional audit rates and switching to a conditional audit regime on the quantity and quality of applications for immediate care. We also do not find evidence for heterogeneous effects across care providers differing in size or hospital status. Our preferred explanation for the lack of audit regime effects is the absence of direct sanctions for noncompliance. The observed divergence of audit rates in the conditional audit regime is the consequence of sorting rather than behavioral responses.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167268115002322
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.

Volume (Year): 131 (2016)
Issue (Month): PB ()
Pages: 160-173

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:131:y:2016:i:pb:p:160-173
DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2015.08.016
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jebo

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