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Emotional advertising: Revisiting the role of product category

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  • Geuens, Maggie
  • De Pelsmacker, Patrick
  • Faseur, Tine

Abstract

In contrast to the Affect Infusion Model, popular advertising planning grids suggest that emotional advertising is effective for low involvement and hedonic products, but not for high involvement or utilitarian products. In two experiments, 400 and 392 consumers respectively evaluate a non-emotional and a product-congruent or product-incongruent emotional appeal promoting four different product types. In a third study, 909 respondents evaluate 323 existing TV commercials. The findings confirm expectations based on the Affect Infusion Model and indicate that for none of the product types negative effects of emotional advertisements appear. However, emotional ads do work better for some than other product types. In addition to clearing out the moderating role of product type, this paper contributes to the literature by showing that previous poorer results of emotional ads for some products may be partly due to less positive attitudes towards the products themselves instead of to the inappropriateness of the appeal.

Suggested Citation

  • Geuens, Maggie & De Pelsmacker, Patrick & Faseur, Tine, 2011. "Emotional advertising: Revisiting the role of product category," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(4), pages 418-426, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:64:y:2011:i:4:p:418-426
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Wan Yu Chang & I Ying Chang, 2014. "The Influences of Humorous Advertising on Brand Popularity and Advertising Effects in the Tourism Industry," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(12), pages 1-13, December.
    2. Bublitz, Melissa G. & Peracchio, Laura A., 2015. "Applying industry practices to promote healthy foods: An exploration of positive marketing outcomes," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 2484-2493.
    3. Claeys, An-Sofie & Cauberghe, Verolien, 2014. "What makes crisis response strategies work? The impact of crisis involvement and message framing," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 182-189.
    4. Crawford, Heather J. & Gregory, Gary D., 2015. "Humorous advertising that travels: A review and call for research," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 569-577.
    5. Lafferty, Barbara A. & Edmondson, Diane R., 2014. "A note on the role of cause type in cause-related marketing," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, pages 1455-1460.

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