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Financial contagion in the laboratory: The cross-market rebalancing channel

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  • Cipriani, Marco
  • Gardenal, Gloria
  • Guarino, Antonio

Abstract

We present the results of the first experimental study of financial markets contagion. We develop a model of financial contagion amenable to be tested in the laboratory. In the model, contagion happens because of cross-market rebalancing, a channel for transmission of shocks across markets first studied by Kodres and Pritsker (2002). Theory predicts that, because of portfolio rebalancing, a negative shock in one market transmits itself to the others, as investors adjust their portfolio allocations. The theory is supported by the experimental results. The price observed in the laboratory is close to that predicted by theory, and strong contagion effects are observed. The results are robust across different market structures. Moreover, as theory predicts, lower asymmetric information in a (“developed”) financial market increases the contagion effects in (“emerging”) markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Cipriani, Marco & Gardenal, Gloria & Guarino, Antonio, 2013. "Financial contagion in the laboratory: The cross-market rebalancing channel," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(11), pages 4310-4326.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:37:y:2013:i:11:p:4310-4326
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbankfin.2013.06.005
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Pragidis, I.C. & Aielli, G.P. & Chionis, D. & Schizas, P., 2015. "Contagion effects during financial crisis: Evidence from the Greek sovereign bonds market," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 127-138.
    2. Chen, Na & Jin, Xiu, 2020. "Industry risk transmission channels and the spillover effects of specific determinants in China’s stock market: A spatial econometrics approach," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C).
    3. Isabel Trevino, 2020. "Informational Channels of Financial Contagion," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 88(1), pages 297-335, January.
    4. Anna Bayona & Oana Peia, 2020. "Financial Contagion and the Wealth Effect: An Experimental Study," Working Papers 202007, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    5. Tran, Ly Thi Hai & Hoang, Thao Thi Phuong & Tran, Hoa Xuan, 2018. "Stock liquidity and ownership structure during and after the 2008 Global Financial Crisis: Empirical evidence from an emerging market," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 114-133.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial contagion; Rebalancing channel; Laboratory experiment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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