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Informational contagion in the laboratory

Author

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  • Cipriani, Marco

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Guarino, Antonio
  • Guazzarotti, Giovanni
  • Tagliati, Federico
  • Fischer, Sven

Abstract

We study the informational channel of financial contagion in the laboratory. In our experiment, two markets with correlated fundamentals open sequentially. In both markets, subjects receive private information. Subjects in the market opening second also observe the history of trades and prices in the first market. We find that although in both markets private information is only imperfectly aggregated, subjects are able to make correct inferences based on the public information coming from the market that opens first. As a result, we observe financial contagion in the laboratory: Indeed, the correlation between asset prices is very close to that predicted by the theory. Finally, as theory predicts, there is no contagion when asset fundamentals are independent: That is, subjects only react to the history of prices and trades in the first market when it is rational to do so because they convey information.

Suggested Citation

  • Cipriani, Marco & Guarino, Antonio & Guazzarotti, Giovanni & Tagliati, Federico & Fischer, Sven, 2015. "Informational contagion in the laboratory," Staff Reports 715, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:715
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Debarsy, Nicolas & Dossougoin, Cyrille & Ertur, Cem & Gnabo, Jean-Yves, 2018. "Measuring sovereign risk spillovers and assessing the role of transmission channels: A spatial econometrics approach," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 21-45.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    information contagion; laboratory experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading
    • G15 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - International Financial Markets

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