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Fintech and big tech credit: Drivers of the growth of digital lending

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  • Cornelli, Giulio
  • Frost, Jon
  • Gambacorta, Leonardo
  • Rau, P. Raghavendra
  • Wardrop, Robert
  • Ziegler, Tania

Abstract

Fintech and big tech companies are making rapid inroads into credit markets. We hand construct a global database of fintech and big tech lending volumes for 79 countries over 2013–2018. Using a panel regression analysis, we find these new forms of digital lending are larger in countries with higher GDP per capita (albeit at a declining rate), where banking sector mark-ups are higher, and where banking regulation is less stringent. We also find that these alternative forms of credit are more developed where the ease of doing business is greater, investor protection disclosure and the efficiency of the judicial system are more advanced, and where bond and equity markets are more developed. Overall, fintech and big tech credit seem to complement other forms of credit, rather than substitute for them.

Suggested Citation

  • Cornelli, Giulio & Frost, Jon & Gambacorta, Leonardo & Rau, P. Raghavendra & Wardrop, Robert & Ziegler, Tania, 2023. "Fintech and big tech credit: Drivers of the growth of digital lending," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 148(C).
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:148:y:2023:i:c:s0378426622003223
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbankfin.2022.106742
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    3. Sebastian Doerr & Jon Frost & Leonardo Gambacorta & Vatsala Shreeti, 2023. "Big techs in finance," BIS Working Papers 1129, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Haibo Lei & Qin Su, 2023. "Does the Use of Digital Finance Affect Household Farmland Transfer-Out?," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 15(16), pages 1-18, August.

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