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School-level resource allocation and education outcomes in Sri Lanka

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  • Abayasekara, Ashani
  • Arunatilake, Nisha

Abstract

Sri Lanka’s public education system suffers from poor examination outcomes and wide disparities in academic achievement across schools. Using School Census data for the year 2016 and a multilevel modelling technique, we examine the link between school-level resources and student performance at the O-Levels. Controlling for several factors, we find that schools with larger shares of in-field and experienced teachers and qualified principals perform better at the O-Levels. Teacher commitment—measured by teacher absenteeism—also matters. Our findings hold several policy implications for improving the equity of school-level resource allocation and, subsequently, educational outcomes in Sri Lanka.

Suggested Citation

  • Abayasekara, Ashani & Arunatilake, Nisha, 2018. "School-level resource allocation and education outcomes in Sri Lanka," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 127-141.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:injoed:v:61:y:2018:i:c:p:127-141
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ijedudev.2017.12.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Esther Duflo & Rema Hanna, 2005. "Monitoring Works: Getting Teachers to Come to School," Working Papers id:301, eSocialSciences.
    2. Asim,Salman & Chase,Robert S. & Dar,Amit & Schmillen,Achim Daniel, 2015. "Improving education outcomes in South Asia : findings from a decade of impact evaluations," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7362, The World Bank.
    3. Paul W. Glewwe & Eric A. Hanushek & Sarah D. Humpage & Renato Ravina, 2011. "School Resources and Educational Outcomes in Developing Countries: A Review of the Literature from 1990 to 2010," NBER Working Papers 17554, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    5. Harsha Aturupane & Paul Glewwe & Suzanne Wisniewski, 2013. "The impact of school quality, socioeconomic factors, and child health on students’ academic performance: evidence from Sri Lankan primary schools," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 2-37, February.
    6. Jonah E. Rockoff, 2004. "The Impact of Individual Teachers on Student Achievement: Evidence from Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 247-252, May.
    7. Karthik Muralidharan & Venkatesh Sundararaman, 2011. "Teacher Performance Pay: Experimental Evidence from India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 119(1), pages 39-77.
    8. Charles T. Clotfelter & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2010. "Teacher Credentials and Student Achievement in High School: A Cross-Subject Analysis with Student Fixed Effects," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(3).
    9. Asankha Pallegedara, 2012. "Demand for private tutoring in a free education country. The case of Sri Lanka," International Journal of Education Economics and Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 3(4), pages 375-393.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kyriakides, Leonidas & Stylianou, Andreas & Eliophotou Menon, Maria, 2019. "The link between educational expenditures and student learning outcomes: Evidence from Cyprus," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1-1.

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