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A simple index of innovation with complexity

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  • Fernandez Donoso, Jose

Abstract

Patents are the main source of data on innovation. Since most of the innovative activity happens outside of the patenting system, and since patents −and innovations- have different quality, complexity, and impact on each market, unweighted sums of patents and proxies are an imperfect indicator of a country’s innovative activity. I generate two very simple indices of innovation (one dependent on the size of a country, and another that normalizes country-size), based on weighting patents and exports by a complexity measure. Each index captures the technological complexity of innovations inside and outside the intellectual property rights system. I empirically analyze the rankings of these innovation indices, and contrast the results with technological development, GDP, and the existing mainstream innovation index.

Suggested Citation

  • Fernandez Donoso, Jose, 2017. "A simple index of innovation with complexity," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 1-17.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:infome:v:11:y:2017:i:1:p:1-17 DOI: 10.1016/j.joi.2016.10.009
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    Cited by:

    1. José Fernández Donoso & Fernando Hernández, 2017. "International protection of intellectual property rights: a stochastic frontier index," Serie Working Papers 41, Universidad del Desarrollo, School of Business and Economics.

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