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Expatriate personality and cultural fit: The moderating role of host country context on job satisfaction

  • Peltokorpi, Vesa
  • Froese, Fabian
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    This study draws on the cultural fit hypothesis to examine interactive effects of host country context and four (Multicultural Personality Questionnaire) expatriate personality traits – Cultural Empathy, Social Initiative, Emotional Stability, and Open Mindedness – on job satisfaction. The cultural fit hypothesis maintains that it is not only the expatriate personality traits per se, but the cultural fit between expatriate personality traits and host country cultural values, norms, and prototypical personality traits that predict expatriate adjustment in host countries (Searle & Ward, 1990). Providing partial support for the cultural fit hypothesis, data derived from 191 expatriates in Brazil and Japan shows that the importance of two personality traits varies in these countries. Specifically, expatriates with high Cultural Empathy were more satisfied with their jobs in Japan than in Brazil, whereas Social Initiative was more important for expatriates in Brazil.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969593113000735
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Business Review.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2014)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 293-302

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:iburev:v:23:y:2014:i:1:p:293-302
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    1. James P Johnson & Tomasz Lenartowicz & Salvador Apud, 2006. "Cross-cultural competence in international business: toward a definition and a model," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 37(4), pages 525-543, July.
    2. J Stewart Black, 1988. "Work Role Transitions: A Study of American Expatriate Managers in Japan," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(2), pages 277-294, June.
    3. Meg G Birdseye & John S Hill, 1995. "Individual, Organizational/Work and Environmental Influences on Expatriate Turnover Tendencies: An Empirical Study," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 26(4), pages 787-813, December.
    4. Earl Naumann, 1993. "Organizational Predictors of expatriate Job Satisfaction," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 24(1), pages 61-80, March.
    5. Richardson, Julia & Mallon, Mary, 2005. "Career interrupted? The case of the self-directed expatriate," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 409-420, November.
    6. Bruce Kogut & Harbir Singh, 1988. "The Effect of National Culture on the Choice of Entry Mode," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 19(3), pages 411-432, September.
    7. Margaret A Shaffer & David A Harrison & K Matthew Gilley, 1999. "Dimensions, Determinants, and Differences in the Expatriate Adjustment Process," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 30(3), pages 557-581, September.
    8. Peltokorpi, Vesa, 2007. "Intercultural communication patterns and tactics: Nordic expatriates in Japan," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 68-82, February.
    9. Shung J Shin & Frederick P Morgeson & Michael A Campion, 2007. "What you do depends on where you are: understanding how domestic and expatriate work requirements depend upon the cultural context," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 38(1), pages 64-83, January.
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