IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Identifying export opportunities for South Africa in the southern engines: A DSM approach

Listed author(s):
  • Pearson, Joseph
  • Viviers, Wilma
  • Cuyvers, Ludo
  • Naudé, Wim

Brazil, China and India have been described as 'southern engines of growth' in the world economy. By 2050, these three countries could count under the top 5 largest economies in the world. This implies many opportunities for international trade. Governments could facilitate such international trade by helping firms identify feasible export opportunities. In this paper we set out a decision support model (DSM) to assist in the identification of such opportunities. We illustrate the potential usefulness of the model by applying it to the case of South Africa--the first time that we are aware of that it has been applied to an African country. The DSM indicates that there exist significant opportunities for South African exporters in 'southern engines of growth', in particular China and India, and to a lesser extent, Brazil. We identify 51 export opportunities in Brazil, 259 in China, and 198 in India. The number of export opportunities identified in China is the largest of any country, emphasizing the importance of the Chinese market for exports from South Africa.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0969593110000090
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal International Business Review.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 (August)
Pages: 345-359

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:eee:iburev:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:345-359
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/133/description#description

Order Information: Postal: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/133/bibliographic
Web: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/133/bibliographic

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as
in new window


  1. repec:eme:ceftpp:v:2:y:2009:i:2:p:163-177 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 1997. "Africa's Growth Tragedy: Policies and Ethnic Divisions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1203-1250.
  3. David E. Bloom & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1998. "Geography, Demography, and Economic Growth in Africa," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(2), pages 207-296.
  4. Naude, Wim, 2009. ".Rushing in where Angels Fear to Tread?.: The Early Internationalization of Indigenous Chinese Firms," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  5. Agata Antkiewicz & John Whalley, 2005. "China's New Regional Trade Agreements," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(10), pages 1539-1557, October.
  6. Horst Siebert, 2007. "China: Coming to Grips with the New Global Player," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(6), pages 893-922, 06.
  7. Bernard, Andrew B. & Redding, Stephen J. & Schott, Peter K., 2004. "Comparative Advantage and Heterogenous Firms," CEPR Discussion Papers 4622, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Jorge Blázquez-Lidoy & Javier Rodríguez & Javier Santiso, 2006. "Angel or Devil? China's Trade Impact on Latin American Emerging Markets," OECD Development Centre Working Papers 252, OECD Publishing.
  9. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1997. "I just ran four million regressions," Economics Working Papers 201, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  10. Edwards, Sebastian, 1998. "Openness, Productivity and Growth: What Do We Really Know?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(447), pages 383-398, March.
  11. Andrew K. Rose, 2005. "The Foreign Service and Foreign Trade: Embassies as Export Promotion," NBER Working Papers 11111, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Amsden, Alice H, 1980. "The Industry Characteristics of Intra-Third World Trade in Manufactures," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 1-19, October.
  13. Wim Naudé & Stephanié Rossouw, 2010. "Early international entrepreneurship in China: Extent and determinants," Journal of International Entrepreneurship, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 87-111, March.
  14. Hertel, Thomas, 1997. "Global Trade Analysis: Modeling and applications," GTAP Books, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University, number 7685, November.
  15. Lawrence Edwards & Phil Alves, 2006. "South Africa'S Export Performance: Determinants Of Export Supply," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 74(3), pages 473-500, 09.
  16. WA Naudéa, 2001. "Shipping Costs And South Africa'S Export Potential: An Econometric Analysis," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 69(1), pages 123-146, 03.
  17. World Bank, 2005. "World Development Indicators 2005," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12426, February.
  18. Venables, Anthony J., 1996. "Trade policy, cumulative causation, and industrial development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 179-197, April.
  19. Lennart Petersson, 2005. "Export Diversification And Intra-Industry Trade In South Africa," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 73(4), pages 785-802, December.
  20. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
  21. Chris Alexander & Ken Warwick, 2007. "Governments, Exports and Growth: Responding to the Challenges and Opportunities of Globalisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(1), pages 177-194, 01.
  22. repec:unu:wpaper:unupb5-2007 is not listed on IDEAS
  23. Harry G. Broadman, 2007. "Africa's Silk Road : China and India's New Economic Frontier," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7186, February.
  24. Sachs, Jeffrey D & Warner, Andrew M, 1997. "Sources of Slow Growth in African Economies," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 6(3), pages 335-376, October.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:iburev:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:345-359. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.