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Does Africa Grow Differently?

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  • Block, S.A.

Abstract

This paper argues that understanding the mechanisms of growth requires going beyond the reduced form, and demonstrates important differences in the mechanisms of growth in Africa. Certain policy distortions and exogenous factors are more costly to growth in Africa than elsewhere, while the growth benefits of other reforms and exogenous factors are more limited in Africa than elsewhere. These differences are most apparent in equations which separately explain the explanatory variables common in reduced form growth equations. An expanded growth accounting framework shows that many of the differences in Africa's growth mechanisms are also quantitatively significant in explaining Africa's slow growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Block, S.A., 1999. "Does Africa Grow Differently?," Papers 31, Bell Communications - Economic Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:bellco:31
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Winford H. Masanjala & Chris Papageorgiou, 2008. "Rough and lonely road to prosperity: a reexamination of the sources of growth in Africa using Bayesian model averaging," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(5), pages 671-682.
    2. Brantley Liddle, 2003. "Developing country growth collapse revisited: demographic influences and regional differences," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-007, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. repec:eee:wdevel:v:96:y:2017:i:c:p:198-215 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Olivier Parent & Abdallah Zouache, 2012. "Geography versus Institutions: New Perspectives on the Growth of Africa and the Middle East," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 168(3), pages 488-518, September.
    5. Cunado, J. & Perez de Gracia, F., 2006. "Real convergence in Africa in the second-half of the 20th century," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 153-167.
    6. Amélie Charles & Olivier Darné & Jean-François Hoarau, 2009. "Does the real GDP per capita convergence hold in the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa?," Working Papers hal-00422522, HAL.
    7. Paap, Richard & Franses, Philip Hans & van Dijk, Dick, 2005. "Does Africa grow slower than Asia, Latin America and the Middle East? Evidence from a new data-based classification method," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(2), pages 553-570, August.
    8. Roman Arjona & Maxime Ladaique & Mark Pearson, 2003. "Social Protection and Growth," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2002(2), pages 7-45.
    9. Rune Jansen Hagen, 2002. "Marginalisation in the Context of Globalisation: Why Is Africa so Poor?," Nordic Journal of Political Economy, Nordic Journal of Political Economy, vol. 28, pages 147-179.
    10. Serge Rey & Florent Deisting, 2012. "GDP per Capita among African Countries over the Period 1950–2008: Highlights of Convergence Clubs," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(4), pages 2779-2800.
    11. Chris Papageorgiou & Winford H. Masanjala, 2006. "Initial Conditions, European Colonialism and Africa's Growth," Departmental Working Papers 2006-01, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
    12. Amélie Charles & Olivier Darne & Jean-François Hoarau, 2012. "Convergence of real per capita GDP within COMESA countries: A panel unit root evidence," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, pages 53-71.
    13. Mvogo, Jean-Paul, 2012. "Les politiques de développement financier en Afrique subsaharienne : définition - enjeux - réalités et propositions," Economics Thesis from University Paris Dauphine, Paris Dauphine University, number 123456789/9120 edited by Métais, Joël.
    14. W.A. NaudÈ & W.F. Krugell, 2003. "An Inquiry into Cities and their Role in Subnational Economic Growth in South Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 12(4), pages 476-499, December.
    15. Roman Arjona & Maxime Ladaique & Mark Pearson, 2001. "Growth, Inequality and Social Protection," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 51, OECD Publishing.
    16. Djiofack-Zebaze, Calvin & Keck, Alexander, 2009. "Telecommunications Services in Africa: The Impact of WTO Commitments and Unilateral Reform on Sector Performance and Economic Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 919-940, May.
    17. Olivier Parent & Abdallah Zouache, 2009. "Geographical Features vs. Institutional Factors : New Perspectives on the Growth of Africa and Middle-East," Post-Print hal-00430382, HAL.
    18. W. A. Naudé, 2004. "The effects of policy, institutions and geography on economic growth in Africa: an econometric study based on cross-section and panel data," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(6), pages 821-849.
    19. Carl-Johan, Dalgaard & Henrik, Hansen, 2009. "Evaluating Aid Effectiveness in the Aggregate: Methodological Issues," MPRA Paper 23025, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Author-Name: Jeffrey D. Sachs & John W. McArthur & Guido Schmidt-Traub & Margaret Kruk & Chandrika Bahadur & Michael Faye & Gordon McCord, 2004. "Ending Africa's Poverty Trap," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 35(1), pages 117-240.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    ECONOMIC GROWTH ; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES;

    JEL classification:

    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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