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Do established health-related quality-of-life measures adequately capture the impact of chronic conditions on subjective well-being?

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  • Böckerman, Petri
  • Johansson, Edvard
  • Saarni, Samuli I.

Abstract

Objectives The paper explores how two well-established, utility-based health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) measures (EQ-5D and 15D) capture the negative effects of various chronic conditions on subjective well-being (SWB). This is important, as both SWB and health utility can be important aims of health policy and instruments in resource allocation.Methods A general population survey representing the Finnish population aged 30 years and over covering 25 self-reported somatic conditions and four psychiatric disorders diagnosed by interviews.Results Both EQ-5D and 15D fail to capture the effects of some chronic conditions on SWB, but the conditions differ between the instruments. Even after controlling for both EQ-5D and 15D simultaneously, common psychiatric disorders decrease SWB by 0.4 points on a scale 1-10.Conclusions Using health utility as a basis for resource allocation is likely to underfund the treatment of psychiatric disorders, in comparison to their effect on the SWB of the population. Different HRQoL instruments yield somewhat different results for different conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Böckerman, Petri & Johansson, Edvard & Saarni, Samuli I., 2011. "Do established health-related quality-of-life measures adequately capture the impact of chronic conditions on subjective well-being?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(1), pages 91-95, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:100:y:2011:i:1:p:91-95
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brooks, Richard AU -, 1996. "EuroQol: the current state of play," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 53-72, July.
    2. Blanchflower, David G. & Oswald, Andrew J., 2008. "Hypertension and happiness across nations," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 218-233, March.
    3. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
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    6. Dolan, Paul, 2000. "The measurement of health-related quality of life for use in resource allocation decisions in health care," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 32, pages 1723-1760 Elsevier.
    7. Daniel Kahneman & Alan B. Krueger, 2006. "Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
    8. Oswald, Andrew J. & Wu, Stephen, 2010. "Objective Confirmation of Subjective Measures of Human Well-being: Evidence from the USA," IZA Discussion Papers 4695, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    1. repec:spr:jhappi:v:18:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10902-016-9800-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:spr:pharme:v:35:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s40273-017-0495-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Christensen, Vibeke Tornhøj & Datta Gupta, Nabanita, 2017. "Hearing loss and disability exit: Measurement issues and coping strategies," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 80-91.
    4. Sun Sun & Jiaying Chen & Magnus Johannesson & Paul Kind & Kristina Burström, 2016. "Subjective Well-Being and Its Association with Subjective Health Status, Age, Sex, Region, and Socio-economic Characteristics in a Chinese Population Study," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 833-873, April.
    5. Silvia Garrido & Ildefonso Méndez & José-María Abellán, 2013. "Analysing the Simultaneous Relationship Between Life Satisfaction and Health-Related Quality of Life," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 14(6), pages 1813-1838, December.

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