IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Cost-benefit analysis of psychological therapy

  • R. Laynard

    (Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, UK,)

  • D. Clark

    (Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, UK,)

  • M. Knapp

    (Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, UK,)

  • G. Mayraz

    (Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, UK,)

At present six million people are suffering from clinical depression or anxiety disorders, but only a quarter of them are in treatment. NICE Guidelines prescribe the offer of evidence-based psychological therapy, but they are not implemented, due to lack of therapists within the NHS. We therefore estimate the economic costs and benefits of providing psychological therapy to people not now in treatment. The cost to the governement would be fully covered by the savings in incapacity benefits and extra taxes that result from more people being able to worl. On our estimates, the cost could be recovered within two years – and certainly within five. And the benefits to the whole economy are greater still. This is not because we expect the extra theropy to be targeted especially at people with problems about work. It is because the cost of the therapy is so small (£750 in total), the recovery rates are so high (50 per cent) and the cost of a person on IB is so large (£750 per month). These findings strongly reinforce the humanitatian case for implementing the NICE Guidelines. Current proposals for doing this would require som8,000 extra psychological therapists withing the NHS over the six years.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://ner.sagepub.com/content/202/1/90.abstract
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by National Institute of Economic and Social Research in its journal National Institute Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 202 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 90-98

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:202:y:2007:i:1:p:90-98
Contact details of provider: Postal: 2 Dean Trench Street, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HE
Phone: +44 (020) 7222 7665
Fax: +44 (020) 7654 1900
Web page: http://www.niesr.ac.uk/

More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Giulia Faggio, 2007. "Job destruction, job creation and unemployment in transition countries: what can we learn?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19716, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Overman, Henry G & Rice, Patricia & Venables, Anthony J, 2008. "Economic Linkages Across Space," CEPR Discussion Papers 6786, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Christos Genakos & Tommaso Valletti, 2008. "Testing the “Waterbed” Effect in Mobile Telephony," CEIS Research Paper 110, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 11 Jul 2008.
  4. Alejandro Cuñat & Marc J. Melitz, 2007. "Volatility, Labor Market Flexibility, and the Pattern of Comparative Advantage," CEP Discussion Papers dp0799, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:202:y:2007:i:1:p:90-98. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.