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Matching and chatting: An experimental study of the impact of network communication on school-matching mechanisms

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  • Ding, Tingting
  • Schotter, Andrew

Abstract

While, in theory, the school matching problem is a static non-cooperative one-shot game, in reality the “matching game” is played by parents who choose their strategies after consulting or chatting with other parents in their social networks. In this paper we compare the performance of the Boston and the Gale–Shapley mechanisms in the presence of chatting through social networks. Our results indicate that allowing subjects to chat has an important impact on the likelihood that subjects change their strategies and also on the welfare and stability of the outcomes determined by the mechanism.

Suggested Citation

  • Ding, Tingting & Schotter, Andrew, 2017. "Matching and chatting: An experimental study of the impact of network communication on school-matching mechanisms," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 94-115.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:gamebe:v:103:y:2017:i:c:p:94-115
    DOI: 10.1016/j.geb.2016.02.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:eee:gamebe:v:113:y:2019:i:c:p:147-163 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:216-225 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Klijn, Flip & Pais, Joana & Vorsatz, Marc, 2019. "Static versus dynamic deferred acceptance in school choice: Theory and experiment," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 147-163.
    4. repec:eee:eecrev:v:101:y:2018:i:c:p:505-511 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Hakimov, Rustamdjan & Kübler, Dorothea, 2019. "Experiments on matching markets: A survey," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Behavior SP II 2019-205, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    6. Hakimov, Rustamdjan & Kübler, Dorothea, 2019. "Experiments On Matching Markets: A Survey," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 153, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    School choice; Matching; Mechanism design; Networks; Chat;

    JEL classification:

    • C78 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Bargaining Theory; Matching Theory
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games

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