IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/enepol/v67y2014icp858-869.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Demand-side management and European environmental and energy goals: An optimal complementary approach

Author

Listed:
  • Bergaentzlé, Claire
  • Clastres, Cédric
  • Khalfallah, Haikel

Abstract

Demand side management (DSM) in electricity markets could improve energy efficiency and achieve environmental targets through controlled consumption. For the past 10 years or so DSM programmes have registered significant results. However, detailed analysis of its real impact as observed by a large number of pilot studies suggests that such programmes need to be fine-tuned to suit clearly identified conditions. This study aims to provide recommendations for the instruments to be used to prompt demand response with a view to maximizing energy and environmental efficiencies of various countries. The present study suggests that different DSM models should be deployed depending on the specific generation mix in any given country. Beside the natural benefits from cross-borders infrastructures, DSM improves the flexibility and reliability of the energy system, absorbing some shock on generation mix. We show efficiency increases with demand response but at a decreasing rate. So, according to rebound and report effects, simple DSM tools could be preferred.

Suggested Citation

  • Bergaentzlé, Claire & Clastres, Cédric & Khalfallah, Haikel, 2014. "Demand-side management and European environmental and energy goals: An optimal complementary approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 858-869.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:67:y:2014:i:c:p:858-869
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.12.008
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421513012524
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rious, Vincent & Perez, Yannick & Roques, Fabien, 2015. "Which electricity market design to encourage the development of demand response?," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 128-138.
    2. Earle, Robert & Kahn, Edward P. & Macan, Edo, 2009. "Measuring the Capacity Impacts of Demand Response," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 22(6), pages 47-58, July.
    3. Luis Olmos & Sophia Ruester & Siok Jen Liong & Jean-Michel Glachant, 2010. "Energy Efficiency Actions Related to the Rollout of Smart Meters for Small Consumers," RSCAS Working Papers 2010/02fsr, European University Institute.
    4. Chao, Hung-po, 2010. "Price-Responsive Demand Management for a Smart Grid World," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 7-20, January.
    5. Strbac, Goran, 2008. "Demand side management: Benefits and challenges," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(12), pages 4419-4426, December.
    6. Stephen P. Holland & Erin T. Mansur, 2006. "The Short-Run Effects of Time-Varying Prices in Competitive Electricity Markets," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 127-156.
    7. Spees, Kathleen & Lave, Lester B., 2007. "Demand Response and Electricity Market Efficiency," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 69-85, April.
    8. Hung-po Chao, 2011. "Demand response in wholesale electricity markets: the choice of customer baseline," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 39(1), pages 68-88, February.
    9. Faruqui, Ahmad & Hledik, Ryan & Newell, Sam & Pfeifenberger, Hannes, 2007. "The Power of 5 Percent," The Electricity Journal, Elsevier, vol. 20(8), pages 68-77, October.
    10. Brophy Haney, A. & Jamasb, T. & Pollitt, M.G., 2009. "Smart Metering and Electricity Demand: Technology, Economics and International Experience," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0905, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Coll-Mayor, Debora & Paget, Mia & Lightner, Eric, 2007. "Future intelligent power grids: Analysis of the vision in the European Union and the United States," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 2453-2465, April.
    12. Severin Borenstein, 2002. "The Trouble With Electricity Markets: Understanding California's Restructuring Disaster," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 191-211, Winter.
    13. Dulleck, Uwe & Kaufmann, Sylvia, 2004. "Do customer information programs reduce household electricity demand?--the Irish program," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1025-1032, June.
    14. A. Greening, Lorna & Greene, David L. & Difiglio, Carmen, 2000. "Energy efficiency and consumption -- the rebound effect -- a survey," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(6-7), pages 389-401, June.
    15. Severin Borenstein, 2005. "The Long-Run Efficiency of Real-Time Electricity Pricing," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 93-116.
    16. Ahmad Faruqui & Sanem Sergici, 2010. "Household response to dynamic pricing of electricity: a survey of 15 experiments," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 193-225, October.
    17. William Vickrey, 1971. "Responsive Pricing of Public Utility Services," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 2(1), pages 337-346, Spring.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:67:y:2014:i:c:p:858-869. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.