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Demarketing fear: Bring the nuclear issue back to rational discourse

Listed author(s):
  • Han, Charles C.
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    This paper attempts to explore the strategies for breaking the deadlock between the demand for resolving climate crisis and the resistance to deploying nuclear power. Since our present renewable technology is not advanced enough to replace fossil fuel power plants, nuclear power becomes the only available means that can buy us more time to explore better energy sources for coping with the dilemma of global warming and energy security. Therefore, this paper proposes an elaborated fear appeal framework that may shed light on the intervention points for mitigating fear. By examining the influence of fear appeal on the nuclear issue, three strategies for demarketing the nuclear fear of the public are recommended. The paper concludes that only when energy policy makers and the nuclear industry recognize the significance of minimizing fear and begin to work on removing the sources of fear, can we then expect to bring the nuclear issue back to rational discourse.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S030142151300952X
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 64 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 183-192

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:64:y:2014:i:c:p:183-192
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.09.028
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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