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Carbon dioxide mitigation target of China in 2020 and key economic sectors

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  • Wang, Yafei
  • Liang, Sai

Abstract

China proposed a CO2 mitigation target in 2020 to deal with anthropogenic global climate change. Chinese policy makers mainly focus on three factors comprising consumption structure changes, energy technology development, and new energy increments. In addition, sectoral CO2 reduction is increasingly concerned in the world. Thus, it is significant to investigate integrated impacts of three factors to China's CO2 mitigation target as well as to identify key economic sectors for achieving this target. In this study, energy demand and CO2 emission in 2020 are predicted. Five scenarios are generated to illustrate the contributions of three factors. In addition, twelve key economic sectors for reducing energy demand and CO2 emission are identified from both production and final demand perspectives. Under integrated impacts of three factors, China's CO2 intensity per unit gross domestic product in 2020 will decrease by about 43.9% in 2020 than 2005 level. In the short term, China's CO2 mitigation will be highly dependent on energy technology development. In the long term, it will mainly rely on reshaped consumption structure changes and new energy development. In addition, China's future policies should focus on 12 identified key economic sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Yafei & Liang, Sai, 2013. "Carbon dioxide mitigation target of China in 2020 and key economic sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 90-96.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:58:y:2013:i:c:p:90-96
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.02.038
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Wan, Liyang & Wang, Can & Cai, Wenjia, 2016. "Impacts on water consumption of power sector in major emitting economies under INDC and longer term mitigation scenarios: An input-output based hybrid approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 26-39.
    2. Weidong Chen & Qing He, 2016. "Intersectoral burden sharing of CO 2 mitigation in China in 2020," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 1-14, January.
    3. Weidong Chen & Qing He, 2016. "Intersectoral burden sharing of CO2 mitigation in China in 2020," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 1-14, January.
    4. Fang Guo & Tao Zhao & Yanan Wang & Yue Wang, 2016. "Estimating the abatement potential of provincial carbon intensity based on the environmental learning curve model in China," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 685-705, October.
    5. Baochen Yang & Chuanze Liu & Yunpeng Su & Xin Jing, 2017. "The Allocation of Carbon Intensity Reduction Target by 2020 among Industrial Sectors in China," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, January.
    6. Lin, Boqiang & Moubarak, Mohamed, 2014. "Mitigation potential of carbon dioxide emissions in the Chinese textile industry," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 781-787.
    7. Zeng, Lin & Xu, Ming & Liang, Sai & Zeng, Siyu & Zhang, Tianzhu, 2014. "Revisiting drivers of energy intensity in China during 1997–2007: A structural decomposition analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 640-647.
    8. Zhang, Yanxia & Wang, Haikun & Liang, Sai & Xu, Ming & Zhang, Qiang & Zhao, Hongyan & Bi, Jun, 2015. "A dual strategy for controlling energy consumption and air pollution in China's metropolis of Beijing," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 294-303.
    9. Zhang, Yanxia & Wang, Haikun & Liang, Sai & Xu, Ming & Liu, Weidong & Li, Shalang & Zhang, Rongrong & Nielsen, Chris P. & Bi, Jun, 2014. "Temporal and spatial variations in consumption-based carbon dioxide emissions in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 60-68.

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