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The CO2 emission reduction benefits of Chinese energy policies and environmental policies:: A case study for Shanghai, period 1995-2020

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  • Gielen, Dolf
  • Changhong, Chen

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  • Gielen, Dolf & Changhong, Chen, 2001. "The CO2 emission reduction benefits of Chinese energy policies and environmental policies:: A case study for Shanghai, period 1995-2020," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 257-270, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:39:y:2001:i:2:p:257-270
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Min, Guan Fu & Mills, Evan & Zhang, Qin, 1997. "Energy efficient lighting in China : Problems and prospects," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 77-83, January.
    2. Halkos, George, 1993. "An evaluation of the direct costs of abatement under the main desulphurisation technologies," MPRA Paper 32588, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ekins, Paul, 1996. "How large a carbon tax is justified by the secondary benefits of CO2 abatement?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 161-187, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gnansounou, Edgard & Dong, Jun & Bedniaguine, Denis, 2004. "The strategic technology options for mitigating CO2 emissions in power sector: assessment of Shanghai electricity-generating system," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1-2), pages 117-133, September.
    2. Brenner, Mark & Riddle, Matthew & Boyce, James K., 2007. "A Chinese sky trust?: Distributional impacts of carbon charges and revenue recycling in China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 1771-1784, March.
    3. Adom, Philip Kofi & Bekoe, William, 2012. "Conditional dynamic forecast of electrical energy consumption requirements in Ghana by 2020: A comparison of ARDL and PAM," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 367-380.
    4. Mustapa, Siti Indati & Bekhet, Hussain Ali, 2016. "Analysis of CO2 emissions reduction in the Malaysian transportation sector: An optimisation approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 171-183.
    5. Siti Indati Mustapa & Hussain Ali Bekhet, 2015. "Investigating Factors Affecting CO2 Emissions in Malaysian Road Transport Sector," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(4), pages 1073-1083.
    6. Rübbelke, Dirk T.G., 2011. "International support of climate change policies in developing countries: Strategic, moral and fairness aspects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(8), pages 1470-1480, June.
    7. Wang, Yafei & Liang, Sai, 2013. "Carbon dioxide mitigation target of China in 2020 and key economic sectors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 90-96.
    8. Suganthi, L. & Samuel, Anand A., 2012. "Energy models for demand forecasting—A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 1223-1240.
    9. Bambawale, Malavika Jain & Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2011. "China's energy security: The perspective of energy users," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 1949-1956.
    10. Wang, Can & Ye, Minhua & Cai, Wenjia & Chen, Jining, 2014. "The value of a clear, long-term climate policy agenda: A case study of China’s power sector using a multi-region optimization model," Applied Energy, Elsevier, pages 276-288.
    11. Pittel, Karen & Rübbelke, Dirk T.G., 2008. "Climate policy and ancillary benefits: A survey and integration into the modelling of international negotiations on climate change," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1-2), pages 210-220, December.
    12. Sreekanth, K.J., 2016. "Review on integrated strategies for energy policy planning and evaluation of GHG mitigation alternatives," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 837-850.
    13. repec:eee:ecomod:v:252:y:2013:i:c:p:44-52 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Ford, Melanie & Matysek, Anna & Jakeman, Guy & Gurney, Andrew & Fisher, Brian S., 2006. "Perspectives on international climate policy," 2006 Conference (50th), February 8-10, 2006, Sydney, Australia 137963, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    15. Phdungsilp, Aumnad, 2010. "Integrated energy and carbon modeling with a decision support system: Policy scenarios for low-carbon city development in Bangkok," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 4808-4817, September.
    16. Cao, Jing & Ho, Mun & Jorgenson, Dale, 2008. "“Co-benefits” of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Policies in China: An Integrated Top-Down and Bottom-Up Modeling Analysis," Discussion Papers dp-08-10-efd, Resources For the Future.
    17. Yu, Yadong & Ren, Hongtao & Kharrazi, Ali & Ma, Tieju & Zhu, Bing, 2015. "Exploring socioeconomic drivers of environmental pressure on the city level: The case study of Chongqing in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 123-131.
    18. Dianshu, Feng & Sovacool, Benjamin K. & Minh Vu, Khuong, 2010. "The barriers to energy efficiency in China: Assessing household electricity savings and consumer behavior in Liaoning Province," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 1202-1209, February.
    19. Eory, Vera, 2015. "Evaluating the use of marginal abatement cost curves applied to greenhouse gas abatement in agriculture," Working Papers 199777, Scotland's Rural College (formerly Scottish Agricultural College), Land Economy & Environment Research Group.
    20. Eory, Vera, 2015. "Evaluating the use of marginal abatement cost curves applied to greenhouse gas abatement in agriculture," Working Papers 199777, Scottish Agricultural College, Land Economy Research Group.

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