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Climate change scenarios and Technology Transfer Protocols

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  • Kypreos, Socrates
  • Turton, Hal

Abstract

We apply a specific version of MERGE-ETL, an integrated assessment model, to study global climate policies supported by Technology Transfer Protocols (TTPs). We model a specific formulation of such a TTP where donor countries finance via carbon tax revenues, the diffusion of carbon-free technologies in developing countries (DCs) and quantify its benefits. Industrialized countries profit from increased technology exports, global diffusion of advanced technology (leading to additional technology learning and cost reductions) and reduced climate damages through the likelihood of greater global participation in a new international agreement. DCs experience increased welfare from access to subsidized technology, and profit from the reduction of damages related to climate change and expected secondary benefits of carbon abatement (such as reduced local and regional air pollution). The analysis identifies potential candidate technologies that could be supported under a TTP, and the impact of a TTP on economic development (including the flow of transfer subsidies) and global emissions. Although a TTP may encourage additional participation, such a proposal is only likely to be successful if an increased willingness to pay to avoid climate damages is accepted, first by the present and future generations of the industrialized world and later on, when sufficient economic growth is accumulated, by today's developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Kypreos, Socrates & Turton, Hal, 2011. "Climate change scenarios and Technology Transfer Protocols," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 844-853, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:2:p:844-853
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tooraj Jamasb, 2007. "Technical Change Theory and Learning Curves: Patterns of Progress in Electricity Generation Technologies," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3), pages 51-72.
    2. Kypreos, Socrates, 2007. "A MERGE model with endogenous technological change and the cost of carbon stabilization," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5327-5336, November.
    3. Yang, Zili & Nordhaus, William D., 2006. "Magnitude and direction of technological transfers for mitigating GHG emissions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(5-6), pages 730-741, November.
    4. McDonald, Alan & Schrattenholzer, Leo, 2001. "Learning rates for energy technologies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 255-261, March.
    5. Manne, Alan & Richels, Richard, 2004. "The impact of learning-by-doing on the timing and costs of CO2 abatement," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 603-619, July.
    6. Kypreos, Socrates, 2005. "Modeling experience curves in MERGE (model for evaluating regional and global effects)," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 30(14), pages 2721-2737.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Hübler, 2015. "A theory-based discussion of international technology funding," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 17(2), pages 313-327, April.
    2. Jin, Wei, 2016. "International technology diffusion, multilateral R&D coordination, and global climate mitigation," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 357-372.
    3. Kypreos, Socrates, 2012. "From the Copenhagen Accord to efficient technology protocols," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 341-353.
    4. Marcucci, Adriana & Turton, Hal, 2015. "Induced technological change in moderate and fragmented climate change mitigation regimes," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 90(PA), pages 230-242.

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