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Greenhouse gas mitigation policies and the transportation sector: The role of feedback effects on policy effectiveness

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  • Stepp, Matthew D.
  • Winebrake, James J.
  • Hawker, J. Scott
  • Skerlos, Steven J.

Abstract

The US transportation sector is a major contributor to global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. As such, policymakers and stakeholder groups have proposed a number of policy instruments aimed at reducing these emissions. In order to fully evaluate the effectiveness of these policies, policymakers must consider both the direct responses associated with policy actions, and the indirect responses that occur through complex relationships within socioeconomic systems. In cases where multiple policy instruments are employed, these indirect effects create policy interactions that are either complementary or competing; policymakers need to understand these interactions in order to leverage policy synergies and manage policy conflicts. Analysis of these indirect effects is particularly difficult in the transportation sector, where system boundaries are uncertain and feedback among systems components can be complicated. This paper begins to address this problem by applying systems dynamics tools (in particular causal loop diagrams) to help identify and understand the role of feedback effects on transportation-related GHG reduction policies. Policymakers can use this framework to qualitatively explore the impacts of various policy instruments, as well as identify important relationships that can be later included in quantitative modeling approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Stepp, Matthew D. & Winebrake, James J. & Hawker, J. Scott & Skerlos, Steven J., 2009. "Greenhouse gas mitigation policies and the transportation sector: The role of feedback effects on policy effectiveness," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 2774-2787, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:37:y:2009:i:7:p:2774-2787
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecolec:v:140:y:2017:i:c:p:46-57 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Skerlos, Steven J. & Winebrake, James J., 2010. "Targeting plug-in hybrid electric vehicle policies to increase social benefits," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 705-708, February.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:742-:d:97541 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bénédicte Meurisse, 2015. "On the relevance of differentiated car purchase taxes in light of the rebound effect," EconomiX Working Papers 2015-24, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    5. Lee, Yongseung & Kim, Chongman & Shin, Juneseuk, 2016. "A hybrid electric vehicle market penetration model to identify the best policy mix: A consumer ownership cycle approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 438-449.
    6. Scholtens, Bert & Kleinsmann, Renske, 2011. "Incentives for subcontractors to adopt CO2 emission reporting and reduction techniques," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1877-1883, March.
    7. Harrison, Gillian & Thiel, Christian, 2017. "An exploratory policy analysis of electric vehicle sales competition and sensitivity to infrastructure in Europe," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 165-178.
    8. Reid, Sergey & Spence, David B., 2016. "Methodology for evaluating existing infrastructure and facilitating the diffusion of PEVs," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 1-10.
    9. Ou, Xunmin & Zhang, Xiliang & Chang, Shiyan, 2010. "Alternative fuel buses currently in use in China: Life-cycle fossil energy use, GHG emissions and policy recommendations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 406-418, January.
    10. Sun, Hui & Zhang, Yiting & Wang, Yuning & Li, Lei & Sheng, Yun, 2015. "A social stakeholder support assessment of low-carbon transport policy based on multi-actor multi-criteria analysis: The case of Tianjin," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 103-116.
    11. Nealer, Rachael & Matthews, H. Scott & Hendrickson, Chris, 2012. "Assessing the energy and greenhouse gas emissions mitigation effectiveness of potential US modal freight policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 588-601.

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