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Understanding technology choice in electricity industries: a comparative study of France and Denmark

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  • Hadjilambrinos, Constantine

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  • Hadjilambrinos, Constantine, 2000. "Understanding technology choice in electricity industries: a comparative study of France and Denmark," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(15), pages 1111-1126, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:28:y:2000:i:15:p:1111-1126
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Midttun, Atle & Thomas, Steve, 1998. "Theoretical ambiguity and the weight of historical heritage: a comparative study of the British and Norwegian electricity liberalisation," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 179-197, February.
    2. Blegaa, Sussanne & Josephsen, Lars & Meyer, Niels I. & Sorensen, Bent, 1977. "Alternative Danish energy planning," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 5(2), pages 87-94, June.
    3. de Carmoy, Guy, 1982. "The new French energy policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 181-188, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nesta, Lionel & Vona, Francesco & Nicolli, Francesco, 2014. "Environmental policies, competition and innovation in renewable energy," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, pages 396-411.
    2. Sovacool, Benjamin K. & Valentine, Scott Victor, 2010. "The socio-political economy of nuclear energy in China and India," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 3803-3813.
    3. Burke, Paul J., 2013. "The national-level energy ladder and its carbon implications," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 18(04), pages 484-503, August.
    4. Markard, Jochen & Petersen, Regula, 2009. "The offshore trend: Structural changes in the wind power sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3545-3556, September.
    5. Markard, Jochen & Truffer, Bernhard, 2006. "Innovation processes in large technical systems: Market liberalization as a driver for radical change?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 609-625, June.
    6. Pahle, Michael, 2010. "Germany's dash for coal: Exploring drivers and factors," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 3431-3442, July.
    7. Chalvatzis, Konstantinos J. & Hooper, Elizabeth, 2009. "Energy security vs. climate change: Theoretical framework development and experience in selected EU electricity markets," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 13(9), pages 2703-2709, December.
    8. Saidur, R. & Islam, M.R. & Rahim, N.A. & Solangi, K.H., 2010. "A review on global wind energy policy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(7), pages 1744-1762, September.
    9. Darmani, Anna & Arvidsson, Niklas & Hidalgo, Antonio & Albors, Jose., 2014. "What drives the development of renewable energy technologies? Toward a typology for the systemic drivers," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 834-847.
    10. Watson, Jim & Kern, Florian & Markusson, Nils, 2014. "Resolving or managing uncertainties for carbon capture and storage: Lessons from historical analogues," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 192-204.
    11. Lehtonen, Markku & Nye, Sheridan, 2009. "History of electricity network control and distributed generation in the UK and Western Denmark," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2338-2345, June.
    12. Mah, Daphne Ngar-yin & Hills, Peter & Tao, Julia, 2014. "Risk perception, trust and public engagement in nuclear decision-making in Hong Kong," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 368-390.
    13. Emam, Sherief & Grebel, Thomas, 2014. "Rising energy prices and advances in renewable energy technologies," Ilmenau Economics Discussion Papers 91, Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Economics.
    14. Solomon, Barry D. & Krishna, Karthik, 2011. "The coming sustainable energy transition: History, strategies, and outlook," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(11), pages 7422-7431.

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