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Innovation processes in large technical systems: Market liberalization as a driver for radical change?

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  • Markard, Jochen
  • Truffer, Bernhard

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  • Markard, Jochen & Truffer, Bernhard, 2006. "Innovation processes in large technical systems: Market liberalization as a driver for radical change?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 609-625, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:35:y:2006:i:5:p:609-625
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