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Innovation, growth and economic development: have the conditions for catch-up changed?

  • Jan Fagerberg
  • Bart Verspagen

This paper shows that there have been important changes in how the global economic system works. A high growth regime has gradually been substituted by one of low growth. This change appears to be especially pronounced for small economies. Until the end of the 1980s, the scope for technological imitation was a significant factor in generating growth in low-income countries but this did not extend to the 1990s. The results reported in this paper suggest that, during the 1990s, whether low-income countries managed to catch up or fall behind depended mainly on their ability to develop their 'innovation system'.

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Article provided by Inderscience Enterprises Ltd in its journal Int. J. of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development.

Volume (Year): 1 (2007)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 13-33

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Handle: RePEc:ids:ijtlid:v:1:y:2007:i:1:p:13-33
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  1. Masters, William A & McMillan, Margaret S, 2001. " Climate and Scale in Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 167-86, September.
  2. Jan Fagerberg & Bart Verspagen, 2001. "Technology-Gaps, Innovation-Diffusion And Transformation: An Evolutionary Interpretation," Working Papers 11, Centre for Technology, Innovation and Culture, University of Oslo.
  3. Jonathan Temple, 1999. "The New Growth Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 112-156, March.
  4. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution," NBER Working Papers 8460, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Fagerberg, Jan, 1994. "Technology and International Differences in Growth Rates," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 1147-75, September.
  6. Paul Romer, 1989. "Endogenous Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 3210, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "The Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: An Empirical Investigation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1369-1401, December.
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